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PETE ROSE CHRONOLOGY
Some key dates in baseball's gambling investigation of Pete Rose:
Feb. 20, 1989 Rose, the Cincinnati Reds' manager, is summoned to the commissioner's office to answer questions. One month later, baseball announces it is investigating "serious allegations against Rose."
March 21, 1989 Sports Illustrated reports on allegations tying Rose to baseball betting.
March 30, 1989 The Cincinnati Enquirer, quoting former baseball security chief Henry Fitzgibbon, says baseball investigated gambling allegations against Rose in the late 1970s.
Aug. 24, 1989 Commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti announces that Rose is banned for life from baseball for gambling. Rose signed a document the previous day saying he is not admitting any guilt and may apply for reinstatement after one year. Giamatti, answering questions, says he has concluded that Rose "bet on baseball."
Sept. 1, 1989 Giamatti dies of a heart attack. His replacement, Fay Vincent, says he has no intention of changing Rose's ban.
April 20, 1990 Rose pleads guilty to two counts of filing false tax returns by failing to report income.
Aug. 10, 1990 Rose reports to federal prison in Marion, Ill., to serve a five-month sentence.
Jan. 7, 1991 Rose is released from prison.
Sept. 1997 Rose applies for reinstatement, but commissioner Bud Selig doesn't rule on it, saying he hasn't seen a reason to alter the ban.
July 13, 1999 Rose is not invited to a ceremony before the All-Star Game honoring the 100 players, including himself, on a ballot to pick baseball's All-Century team. Selig says "I don't think there's anything new or if there's anything new that I would do to change what Bart Giamatti did" in kicking Rose out of baseball.
Oct. 24, 1999 At a ceremony honoring baseball's All-Century team before Game 2 of the World Series in Atlanta, Selig allows Rose to appear in the ballpark. Rose receives the longest ovation of any other player. Coming off the field, NBC's Jim Gray repeatedly asks Rose if he wants to apologize to fans for betting on baseball, but Rose tries to change the subject. Gray's contentious interview draws criticism from players and fans.
Sept. 22, 2002 At the closing ceremony at Cinergy Field, former Reds pitcher Tom Browning spray-paints a red No. 14 on the pitcher's mound as the stadium erupts in chants of "Pete! Pete!"
Sept. 23, 2002 Rose organizes his own celebrity softball game to bid farewell to Cinergy Field, where he made so much history. More than 40,000 fans show up to watch Rose, Johnny Bench, Tony Perez, Joe Morgan and other celebrities. One sign in the stands reads, "Rose in the Hall. Bet on it."
Oct. 22, 2002 During a promotion of baseball's "most memorable moments" before Game 4 of the World Series in San Francisco, Rose receives a 70-second standing ovation and chants of "Hall of Fame!" from the crowd.
Nov. 25, 2002 Rose and Selig meet secretly in Milwaukee about the career hits leader's reinstatement application.
Jan. 5, 2004 In excerpts of his autobiography to be published later that week, Rose admits he gambled on baseball games, including those of the Reds.

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