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Updated: Thursday, November 25, 2004 1:52 AM EST
NCAA BASKETBALL RECAP
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(12) North Carolina 106, Iowa 92

LAHAINA, Hawaii (Ticker) -- A three-day tournament in Hawaii did wonders to revitalize Rashad McCants and No. 12 North Carolina.

McCants scored 22 points to lead five players in double figures and the Tar Heels to the Maui Invitational championship with a 106-92 victory over Iowa.

North Carolina (3-1), which won its second Maui Invitational title, averaged 95 points in three games after opening the season with 66 in a stunning loss to Santa Clara.

McCants followed up his 27-point game against Tennessee in the semifinals with another strong game against the Hawkeyes to earn a spot on the All-Tournament team.

Raymond Felton scored 13 points, including a one-handed dunk and a behind-the-back layup on back-to-back possessions early in the second half and was named the tournament's Most Valuable Player.

Felton, who missed the Santa Clara game because of a one-game NCAA suspension, also had nine assists.

Jawad Williams scored 18 points and Sean May added 16 for the Tar Heels, who forced 22 turnovers by the Hawkeyes.

The Tar Heels pulled away in the first half with a 17-5 run capped by consecutive 3-pointers by Melvin Scott that provided a 44-29 lead. North Carolina closed out the half by making 11-of-14 shots to build a 59-40 advantage.

Adam Haluska scored 19 points and Jeff Horner added 18 for Iowa (3-1), which beat Texas and Louisville to reach the final. The Hawkeyes won the tournament in 1987.

Haluska shot 22-of-40 in the first two games of the tournament but managed just seven shots against the Tar Heels, hitting three. He sank 11-of-13 free throws.

North Carolina has reached the final here in all four appearances and also won in 1999. Coach Roy Williams also won the tournament with Kansas in 1996.

The Tar Heels never trailed and had a 48-24 edge in points in the paint while shooting nearly 53 percent (29-of-53).


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