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Updated: Thursday, December 30, 2004 10:16 PM EST
NCAA FOOTBALL RECAP
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Boston College 37, North Carolina 24
BOSTON COLLEGE EAGLES
Boston College Eagles
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NORTH CAROLINA TAR HEELS
North Carolina Tar Heels
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CHARLOTTE (Ticker) -- Boston College quarterback Paul Peterson cheered the play of the game while lying on a stretcher.

Kicker Ryan Ohliger ran for a 21-yard touchdown on a fake field goal - one play after Peterson was carted off the field with a broken left leg - as Boston College defeated North Carolina, 37-24, in the Continental Tire Bowl.

Playing with a plate and five screws in his surgically-repaired right hand, Peterson turned in a gritty performance, completing 24-of-33 passes for 236 yards and two touchdowns.

Peterson broke his hand against Temple on November 20 and did not play in Boston College's 43-17 loss to Syracuse the following week that cost the Eagles a berth in the Bowl Championship Series. After undergoing surgery, he returned to practice on December 19.

"I didn't know if I would be able to play today, but once they said it would be a short recovery and that I would be throwing in no time, I was pretty excited," Peterson said. "My throws weren't tight spirals, but it got there most of the time. I couldn't put a lot of pressure on it because it is still broken."

With the Eagles (9-3) nursing a 27-24 lead early in the fourth quarter, Peterson suffered a broken leg when he was stopped for a one-yard loss on 3rd-and-1 from the Tar Heels 20.

When played resumed, Boston College coach Tom O'Brien stunned the Tar Heels (6-6) with his call for a fake. Holder Matt Ryan - the Eagles backup quarterback - handed off to Ohliger, who broke a tackle en route to the end zone and a 34-24 lead with 10:32 remaining.

"I thought it was the right time," Boston College coach Tom O'Brien said. "We had some things prepared in the kicking game that if the opportunity presented itself we were going to use them. And that was a great opportunity."

Peterson was diagnosed with a broken tibia. Despite the discomfort, he pumped his fists and clapped his hands as he was taken off the field.

"I was shocked, I couldn't believe that coach called that play," Peterson said. "I was very excited after that play."

"Both of our special teams coaches had talked about being aware of the fake," North Carolina coach John Bunting said. "They had a heck of a play devised to run away from our block. They ran a great play."

It was redemption for Ohliger, who missed a 22-yard field goal in the first half and a potentially critical extra point after the Eagles had taken a 27-24 lead on Andre Callender's one-yard TD run 46 seconds into the fourth period.

Callender rushed for 174 yards on 26 carries, including a 38-yard run that set up his go-ahead score.

Boston College, which becomes an official member of the Atlantic Coast Conference next season, recorded its fifth straight bowl win in as many seasons. The Eagles are the only team in the country with such a streak.

North Carolina's Darian Durant threw three TD passes in the first half, but was shut down in the second as the Tar Heels were held to a field goal. He completed 23-of-41 passes for 259 yards.

"It's a real disappointing end to a very credible season for this football team and football program," Bunting said. "We certainly had our opportunities to win this game, and it's about winning when you get to this point."

The offenses dominated in the first half as the quarterbacks exchanged scores. Peterson was especially sharp in the opening 30 minutes, completing 18-of-23 passes for 187 yards and both his TDs. Peterson's one-yard TD toss to David Kashetta tied the game, 21-21, with 17 seconds left in the half.

Connor Barth's 27-yard field goal gave the Tar Heels a 24-21 lead with 4 1/2 minutes left in the third quarter.

Backup kicker William Troost converted an 18-yard field goal for the Eagles with just over four minutes remaining in the contest.


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