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Click here for more on this story
Posted: Monday January 29, 2001 9:38 AM

Click the newspaper name link to read full story.

From the Newsstand
  The Buzz What it means
John Eisenberg of The Baltimore Sun says you saw it. The Giants gave in. Early. Long before the game was over. Long before it was even decided. They knew they weren't going to win. They knew the other team was tougher. They knew the Ravens were just too rough, too brutal, too good. Everyone knows now. Enjoy every minute, Baltimore, because your cup is as full as it can ever be. Forget the Colts' overtime win in 1958. This is now Baltimore's "Greatest Game Ever Played." Doubt it? Come on. After enduring the frustration of 30 years without a title and the humility of 12 years without a team, beating New York's finest by 27 points in the Super Bowl is, quite simply, a local sports moment without compare.
Lisa Olsen of the New York Daily News says if you're the sort who estimates the essence of a person on how he acts and reacts under pressure, then Brian Billick was the loser, the Ravens' 34-7 beating of the Giants notwithstanding. The stench of the Ravens' win will hang over the NFL for quite a while, much longer than it will take for Jim Fassel to recover from his team's one bad moment amongst two months of grandeur. Fassel, Billick's friend and peer, was the loser, at least as that term is defined in 60 minutes. "A year of feeling good, a day of disappointment," Fassel said. He retreated to a large cocoon of family and friends who couldn't wait to toast him. Maybe some day we'll find a better definition for how we define a victor.
Liz Clarke of The Washington Post says after the Vince Lombardi trophy had been hoisted in the air, and a blanket of silver glitter covered the playing field, Ravens owner Art Modell sat in the basement of Raymond James Stadium on Sunday night and faced what felt more like a jury than an audience. It was a sentiment Modell showered on his own family when the night was over. "There is a lot of chemistry in this organization and a lot of love for each other," Modell said of his coaching staff and players. "Lombardi told me that years and years ago: In order to win, you have to love each other."
Wallace Matthews of the New York Post says so they gave the Super Bowl MVP award to Ray Lewis, a call so predictable you could have made it before the game, assuming the Ravens beat the Giants. And they did, convincingly, but the player most responsible for Baltimore's 34-7 victory wore not the uniform of the victor, but of the vanquished. In a Super Bowl dominated by the Ravens, the player who made the biggest impact on the game was a New York Giant. The key New York Giant, in fact. As far as the Ravens are concerned, their Most Valuable Player in Super Bowl XXXV was Kerry Collins.


 
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