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Not so fast

Latest: Friday September 22, 2000 10:37 AM

  • Athlete of the Hour
  • Beauts & Busts
  • Featured Expert
  • Four Years Ago
  • Gold Rush
  • Head Games
  • Heard Around Town
  • Margin of Victory
  • On the Spot
  • Storylines
  • By Mitch Gelman and Adam Levine, CNNSI.com

    SYDNEY, Australia -- When he finished his first 100-meter heat, sprinter Ato Boldon shook his head.

    "Too fast, way too fast," he said.

    The sprinter from Trinidad and Tobago had run a 10.04, which would not win the bet he had with his H.S.I. teammates. The wager among the group that trains under Los Angeles-based coach John Smith was over who could win his heat in the slowest time.

    Boldon knew instantly he was a loser. The others, U.S. sprinters Maurice Greene (10.31), Curtis Johnson (10.30) and Jon Drummond (10.20) all ran slower times, but still qualified for the semifinal heats on Saturday.

    Boldon's time was the fastest of the day ( Obadele Thompson , of Barbados, also won a heat in 10.04). Come Saturday night's final, you can bet nobody will hold back.

    If he wins the 100, what reward does Boldon expect from his country? "Tobago," he said.

    Nobody will be able to go too fast Saturday in the 100-meter sprint finals at Olympic Stadium. Can Maurice Greene hold off training partners Ato Boldon and Jon Drummond ? And in the women's 100, we learn whether Marion Jones will have the first of five potential gold medals.
    Dutch swimmer Inge de Bruijn takes aim on her third gold medal of the Games in the women's 50-meter freestyle.
    In another must-win game, the U.S. softball team plays Italy. They exorcised the demons from their bats. Now, they need to get some hits.
    Cheryl Haworth, 17, of Savannah, Ga., who started lifting to gain arm strength, won a bronze medal in the 165-pound plus class.
    The line of the week was in the Sydney Morning Herald the day after two-time defending Olympic 400-meter champion Marie-Jose Perec completed her 6,000-kilometer dash to Singapore. It read: 1992: One gold. 1996: Two golds. 2000: One false start.
    The difference a week has made for Eric "The Swimmer" Moussambani, now the most popular athlete around Sydney. The 20-meter-pool specialist from Equatorial Guinea climbed the city's Harbor Bridge with a newspaper cameraman in tow.
    Police have captured one of two people who escaped from a prison located across from the Olympic Village and briefly commandeered a van with members of the Korean sports delegation in it. But one escaped convict is still on the loose. Who thought it was a good idea to build the Village across the street from Silverwater Prison?
    It was on gymnastics competition manager Kym Dowdell's watch that the vault was set at 120 centimeters. rather than the correct 125 centimeters. Said U.S.A. Gymnastics president Bob Colarossi: "This would be like if you made the track the wrong size."
    U.S. weightlifter Tara Nott, who stayed clean, and was belatedly granted a gold medal in the 48-kilogram class when the original winner, Bulgarian lifter Izabela Dragneva, was eliminated after testing positive for a weight-loss diuretic called furosemide.
    Cell phones have caused problems at the tennis venue, where a match was stopped when someone was talking too loudly at courtside, and at the weightlifting venue where strategically timed calls from coaches to athletes near the lifters were allegedly placed in an effort to distract competitors.

    Tennis may have another major to add to the Grand Slam. A major disappointment that is. Sports Illustrated's Alex Wolff says the
    humdrum atmosphere surrounding tennis at the Sydney Olympics falls on the International Tennis Federation.
    Two people are killed and at least 65 others injured by an explosion during a musical performance in Centennial Olympic Park.
    Today's Finals | SI's Brian Cazeneuve: Daily Medal Picks
    Badminton  Women's Doubles 
       Men's Singles 
    Cycling  Women's Mountain Bike 
    Diving  Women's 3-Meter Springboard Synchronized 
       Men's 10-Meter Platform Synchornized 
    Fencing  Women's Team Foil 
    Gymnastics  Men's Trampoline 
    Rowing  Women's Single Sculls | Coxless Pair | Double Sculls 
       Men's Coxless Pair | Double Sculls | Coxless Four 
    Shooting  Men's 50-Meter Free Rifle | Skeet 
    Swimming  Women's 50-Meter Freestyle | 4x100-Meter Medley Relay 
       Men's 1,500-Meter Freestyle | 4x100-Meter Medley Relay 
    Table Tennis  Men's Doubles 
    Track and Field  Women's 100-Meters 
       Men's 100-Meters | Javelin 
    Water Polo  Women's 
    Weightlifting  Men's 85 Kilograms 
    Trinidad and Tobago sprinter Ato Boldon explains why American Maurice Greene is the one who needs to worry about winning the 100-meter final.
    The giant-screen televisions showing events in parks around Darling Harbour have become a popular way for people without tickets to capture the Olympic spirit. The crowds are as passionate as any at the venues and there are no lines or traffic jams.
    Zero. In only the second dead heat in Olympic swimming history, U.S. swimmers Gary Hall Jr. and Anthony Ervin finished the 50-meter freestyle as co-gold medalists. It also happened in 1984 in the women's 100-meter free when U.S. swimmers Nancy Hogshead and Carrie Steinseifer tied for the gold.
    Marion Jones has promised five gold medals from these Games. She has to start by winning the 100 meters Saturday.


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