Posts Tagged ‘Haircuts’

Stars, Stripes & Rings, Courtesy of Desirée

RICHMOND, British Columbia — First up at the oval in Tuesday’s men’s 10,000-meter final was 23-year-old American Ryan Bedford, skating in a weird situation: alone. Italian Enrico Fabris had pulled out of the race, leaving a field that typically races in pairs at an odd-numbered 15. Bedford, the slowest qualifier remaining, was stuck flying solo, and he spent a lonely 13:40.20 on the ice. The Dutch fans who consider this a monster event were nice enough to cheer each time he glided past, but Bedford found it difficult to set a proper pace and finished 12th. Beforehand, he and his teammates had joked that if his legs died and his lap times got really bad, “I would just peel off my hood and skate the last couple of laps without it.”

That doesn’t seem like a good joke — until you see what was under Bedford’s hood:

Ryan Bedford

(Luke Winn/SI)

Ryan Bedford

(Luke Winn/SI)

Bedford, who’s only been competing in long-track events for two years, wasn’t a serious contender in the Olympic 10,000, but he left his mark on the games by rocking what was by far its most ambitious (and patriotic) hairdo. He was pressured into it by elder teammate Chad Hedrick, who told him last week, “You’ve only got one shot. This is your only race at the Olympics, so let’s do something crazy.”

Their mutual friend in Vancouver, a programmer named Naz Bhayani, directed Bedford to a stylist at the downtown salon Propaganda, whose Web site slogan is, We are here to beautify the world. “Her name was Desirée, and she’s one of the best in the world at doing straight razor lines,” Bedford said. “She hooked me up with this one.”

Ryan Bedford

Ryan Bedford, pre-dyejob. (U.S. Speedskating)

The process took three hours on Monday night: stars on the left side, stripes on the right side, rings on the back. It cost a few hundred dollars — it was Bhayani’s treat, so Bedford didn’t know the exact price — and left him looking nothing like his headshot on the U.S. Speedskating Web site (shown at right).

Bedford debuted the ‘do later that evening in the Athletes’ Village in front of a few U.S. hockey players, who loved it, and then unveiled it to the rest of the world in Tuesday’s 10,000. When he flies back to Salt Lake City next week to begin training for Sochi, he assumes he’ll have no trouble at customs. “I won’t even have to show my passport,” he said. “[They'll tell me], ‘Just walk in, sir.’”


  • Published On Feb. 23, 2010 by lukewinn


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