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TREASURE HOARD
John O'Reilly
February 03, 1958
Gently held in the hand of Professor Hubbs, these treasures of the deep were hauled up from 1,200 feet below the surface by the expedition's deep-sea nets. They include lantern fish which provide their own light in the primeval blackness and small, ruby-red shrimps. Along with many strangely beautiful jellyfish, copepods, arrow worms and amphipods, the nets also hauled up from the lower layers of the sea many bristlemouths, which, according to Professor Hubbs, are probably the most numerous fish in the world's waters, although few people ever have an opportunity to see them.
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February 03, 1958

Treasure Hoard

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Gently held in the hand of Professor Hubbs, these treasures of the deep were hauled up from 1,200 feet below the surface by the expedition's deep-sea nets. They include lantern fish which provide their own light in the primeval blackness and small, ruby-red shrimps. Along with many strangely beautiful jellyfish, copepods, arrow worms and amphipods, the nets also hauled up from the lower layers of the sea many bristlemouths, which, according to Professor Hubbs, are probably the most numerous fish in the world's waters, although few people ever have an opportunity to see them.

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