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19TH HOLE: The Readers Take Over
February 24, 1958
TRADES Sirs:Last winter I enjoyed reading from week to week the trades proposed by some self-appointed general managers to strengthen their favorite teams. So, before spring training begins, I would like to get into the act by proposing my own trades to get the Washington Senators out of the cellar.
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February 24, 1958

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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1) Carrasquel

ss

2) Richardson

2b

3) Simpson

rf

4) M. Throneberry

1b

5) D. Williams

cf

6) Lumpe

3b

7) Berberet

c

8) Collins

If

TRADES
Sirs:
Last winter I enjoyed reading from week to week the trades proposed by some self-appointed general managers to strengthen their favorite teams. So, before spring training begins, I would like to get into the act by proposing my own trades to get the Washington Senators out of the cellar.

First I would trade Chuck Stobbs, Bob Usher and Eddie FitzGerald to Cleveland for Dick Williams and Chico Carrasquel. Then I would send Eddie Yost and Roy Sievers to the Yankees for Don Larsen, Al Cicotte, Marv Throneberry, Harry Simpson, Joe Collins, Jerry Lumpe and Bobby Richardson. For a final touch Jim Lemon, Clint Courtney, Rocky Bridges and Milt Bolling to the Dodgers for Don Newcombe.

The lineup thus would be:

[This article contains a table. Please see hardcopy of magazine or PDF.]

Pitchers: Newcombe, Ramos, Pascual, Larsen, Kemmerer, Cicotte, Byerly.
W. J. LEWERS
Bellerose, N.Y.

A DUNCE'S CAP FOR BIZMAC
Sirs:
Bizmac, the Army's giant computer (E&D, March 18, '57), predicted some 1957 individual baseball averages which, showing all due respect for this mechanical brain, were completely off the beam. The Bizmac estimates as compared with the official 1957 final averages were a follows:

Apparently, Bizmac is a flop as a baseball forecaster and should be ejected from the Hot Stove League until a visible improvement is made.
JEFFREY S. BORER
Brooklyn

A YANKEE MANIFESTO
Sirs:
I am a true, diehard Yankee fan and therefore know that unless you are uncommonly lucky the Yanks are invincible.

To beat the Yankees you must break records, play way over your heads, wound Mickey Mantle and catch all bad hops in your hip pocket.

Let's examine the record. Since Casey Stengel waddled into Yankee Stadium in 1949, the Yanks have not won (we never use the word, ugh, lost) only one American League pennant. That year, 1954, they won 103 games, the alltime record number of wins for a second-place team. It was the highest win total in Stengel's regime—the only time, in fact, a Stengel team had gone over the century mark.

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