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Look How the Owners Smile
Tex Maule
March 10, 1958
Television has dumped happy problems on pro football—how to handle all the fans and cash
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March 10, 1958

Look How The Owners Smile

Television has dumped happy problems on pro football—how to handle all the fans and cash

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THE RED AND THE BLACK OF PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL
Attendance figures for six home games and seasonal profits and losses

 

1953

1957 (estimated)

 

Home Attendance

Radio-TV Income

Net Profit

Home Attendance

Radio-TV Income

Net Profit

BALTIMORE

168,038

$93,500

-$55,622

273,000

$125,000

$100,000

CHICAGO BEARS

200,053

140,000

354

257,000

125,000

70,000

CHICAGO CARDS

75,187

52,718

-272,365

110,000

100,000

-50,000

CLEVELAND

256,862

147,200

55,035

300,000

160,000

125,000

DETROIT

300,565

136,725

108,562

318,000

160,000

150,000

GREEN BAY

121,290

62,500

20,978

154,000

75,000

50,000

LOS ANGELES

263,719

79,625

77,747

376,000

125,000

150,000

NEW YORK

143,424

158,050

9,035

282,000

175,000

70,000

PHILADELPHIA

141,679

125,008

32,275

130,000

100,000

5,000

PITTSBURGH

165,228

95,000

21,558

170,000

100,000

20,000

SAN FRANCISCO

193,045

68,500

76,642

314,000

100,000

165,000

WASHINGTON

144,504

80,000

-5,374

157,000

125,000

25,000

TOTALS

2,164,594

$1,238,826

$68,825

2,841,000

$1,470,000

$880,000

When the Detroit Lions held their annual stockholders' meeting in the Sheraton-Cadillac Hotel the other day, only about 50 of the 130-odd owners showed up. They were in a jovial, happy mood; suntans were a dime a dozen, and the conversation, as often as not, was about building cooperative apartment houses and driving sports cars and the weather in Florida.

Edwin J. Anderson, the president of the Lions, called the meeting to order. Mr. Anderson wore a large red carnation, a shirt with a white collar and a pleated blue front tastefully decorated with small red figures, and an air of authority—all with aplomb. He has the thickest eyebrows west of John L. Lewis, and he is an amiable, very capable man who is also president of the Goebel Brewing Company. A Beloit College football player in the mid-'20s, he has been president of the Lions for eight years. Knute Rockne called him "one of the finest players I have seen" after Anderson performed nobly against the Irish in 1925.

Anderson waved the heavy eyebrows vigorously at his stockholders and said, "I'm not surprised at the small turnout. Any time a business is doing well, the stockholders stay away from the meetings. Have a bad year, and you have to hire a hall for all of them." The president's report indicated that the Lions are not likely to hire a hall any time in the near future either.

The Lions averaged some 53,000 fans at home games in 1957—more than the capacity of Briggs Stadium. They are an artistic as well as an economic success, winning four division and three world titles since the 1950 season, when Anderson took over as club president.

No small part of this success must be ascribed to W. Nicholas Kerbawy, the ebullient general manager of the club. Kerbawy, a former high school Spanish teacher, joined the Lions in 1948, and his flamboyant personality and flair for sports promotion melded perfectly into the maturing business of pro football. Like the more successful of this new breed of executive, Kerbawy sleeps in cat naps during the season so that he can be instantly available at any hour of day or night for the quick decisions that spell the difference between champs and tail-enders.

SUCCESS FOLLOWS MERGER

The prosperity ol the Lions is typical of the tremendous burgeoning of professional football in the last five years. Actually, the growth of the sport began in 1950, after the old All-America Conference folded, ending a suicidal battle between the rival leagues which cost owners millions of dollars but which created many new pro football fans. With the additional boost provided by wise use of television, the pro sport has climbed steadily since; only the Chicago Cardinals lost money last season, and the Cardinals are a unique case. Competing in the only two-team city, they must share the popularity (and the football dollar) with George Halas' perenially colorful and successful Bears.

Yet, despite the growing prosperity of the sport, Commissioner Bert Bell of the National Football League manages to strike an arresting poor-mouth note. "Anyone who gets into this business to make money should have his head examined," says Commissioner Bell.

Indeed, it appears that although the National Football League has broken attendance records in nine of the last 12 seasons (1957 was up a whopping 11% over 1956), skyrocketing costs have kept the owners' profits down. For example: the Lions, in 1953, had a player payroll of $300,156; but by 1957 it was up to $384,000. Over-all operating cost of the Lions has gone from $1,200,000 in 1953 to $1,600,000 in 1957, and even the tremendous increase in attendance could not have overcome this rise without the pros' ace in the hole—television.

The Lions' television and radio rights bring them $160,000 per year; their net profit after taxes in 1957 was $151,052. At first glance, it would seem that without television the club would have lost about $9,000, but this quick estimate does not take into account the tax bite. The Lions' gross profit in 1957 was $309,000, including the TV take. Without television and radio, the gross would have been some $149,000, leaving a net profit after taxes of about $71,520.

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