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19TH HOLE: The Readers Take Over
March 10, 1958
JAPAN: SPORTING SCHOLAR Sirs: Sports writing reached a new dimension with Herbert Warren Wind's articles on sports in Japan (The Bouncing Ball, SI, Feb. 24; Around the Mulberry Bush, SI, March 3). He should receive the thanks and bows of the world for telling, brilliantly, this story with the powerful and scholarly discernment of a person who understands and can describe the true dimension of sports. HARRINGTON HARLOW New York City
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March 10, 1958

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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JAPAN: SPORTING SCHOLAR
Sirs:
Sports writing reached a new dimension with Herbert Warren Wind's articles on sports in Japan (The Bouncing Ball, SI, Feb. 24; Around the Mulberry Bush, SI, March 3). He should receive the thanks and bows of the world for telling, brilliantly, this story with the powerful and scholarly discernment of a person who understands and can describe the true dimension of sports.
HARRINGTON HARLOW
New York City

E & D: LA PETITE ARMEE
Sirs:
Napoleon said, "An army marches on its stomach," and a platitude was born. For years people have accepted it without question, and yet when a penguin finally has the courage to put it to the test (E & D, Feb. 17), his efforts are contemptuously dismissed with the phrase, "Yes, the bird is lost." This is, I feel, a poor attitude to have toward pure research in this post-sputnik age.

In view of his unproletarian attire, a penguin, however pure and scientific his intent, is hardly likely to be allowed to follow in the Great Man's footsteps and either advance upon, or retreat from, Moscow. Why then should it evoke surprise that this hardy little bird should attempt the next best thing by marching on the South Pole? He may not have an army but he is certainly marching on his stomach, and of such stuff are disciples made.

Lost indeed! A pox upon pundits and professors without imagination.
PETER BATTY-SMITH
Vancouver, B.C.

FOCUS: TENNIS BOILS AND BUBBLES
Sirs:
Congratulations on your article Comes the Tennis Revolution (SI, Feb. 24). What happened at the last USLTA annual meeting was certainly a revolution, and tennis lovers only hope it will sweep away the stuffiness with which American tennis has until now been plagued.

I agree with you regarding the abrupt dropping of Bill Talbert as Davis Cup captain. He did a very excellent job in every way over the past few years as our captain, and it would have been so easy to have arranged it so he could have gracefully retired. We shall miss his brains and industry, and wish Mr. Jones the best of luck as his replacement.
ALASTAIR B. MARTIN
New York City

•Alastair Martin, 1956 U.S. Amateur Court Tennis Singles champion, was vice-chairman of the USLTA Davis Cup Committee.—ED.

Sirs:
Comes the Tennis Revolution makes too much of an issue over what you call the Jacksonian spoils system. There have been other presidents of the USLTA from outside the East, notably Colonel James H. Bishop of Culver Military Academy who served in 1953, 1954 and 1955. Though tennis was born and grew up in the East, it has long been a national game, and Mr. Denny and his fellow officers are merely giving it a national administration. There are many Easterners, Southerners and Middle Westerners on USLTA committees along with those from the Pacific Coast.

Billy Talbert, far from being summarily dismissed, is a member of both the Davis Cup Committee and the Davis Cup Selection Committee, so obviously his talents are needed, and he has not been "brushed aside."
E. C. POTTER
New York City

•Mr. Potter, who writes regularly for World Tennis magazine, is in error. At the time SPORTS ILLUSTRATED'S article appeared Billy Talbert had not been asked to serve on either Davis Cup Committee. Since then his services have been solicited by USLTA aides.—ED.

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