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You Can't Beat the Cards
Charles Goren
April 14, 1958
I crossed the East River to play bridge with the Dodgers on the last day of baseball glory for Ebbets Field and Brooklyn.
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April 14, 1958

You Can't Beat The Cards

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I crossed the East River to play bridge with the Dodgers on the last day of baseball glory for Ebbets Field and Brooklyn.

We played on top of a trunk in the players' dressing room—the baseball man's accustomed card table. In the course of three rubbers Manager Walt Alston kept shuffling his lineup. I played with and against Pee Wee Reese, Gil Hodges, Gino Cimoli, Ed Roebuck, the mgr himself and Coach Billy Herman—since departed for Milwaukee. Duke Snider, Charlie Neal, Don Zimmer, Jake Pitler and perhaps half a dozen other knowledgeable kibitzers left no doubt that bridge is this team's favorite card game.

How good is their bridge? Judge for yourself by the way I got caught in this double play.

Gino opened the club 10. Billy won with the ace and led back the jack. The situation did not look hopeful. I was sure to lose a diamond, and East figured to have two trump tricks in order to justify his double. However, there was a chance if I could trap Billy.

I planned to lead a heart to dummy's ace and trump a heart in my hand, cash the ace and king of diamonds and trump another heart, then cash the high club. At this point I hoped to find the cards like this:

N

[Ace of Spades]
[Queen of Spades]
[Jack of Hearts]
[9 of Hearts]
[5 of Diamonds]
[— of Clubs]

W

[6 of Spades]
[3 of Spades]
[Queen of Hearts]
[Jack of Diamonds]
[9 of Clubs]

E

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