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A worldwide roundup of the sports information of the week
May 12, 1958
RECORD BREAKERS—EDDIE SOUTHERN, U. of Texas powerboy regarded by some as nation's finest runner (see page 45), buzzed around two turns in rabbit-quick tempo, sprinted 440 in 46.1 to break 12-year-old college record (46.2 by Illinois' Herb McKenley) in triangular meet with Rice and Texas A&M at Austin (May 1). Complained Eddie: "This is the worst I've felt in a long time. I didn't get this tired when I ran hard for four straight days."
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May 12, 1958

A Worldwide Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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RECORD BREAKERS—EDDIE SOUTHERN, U. of Texas powerboy regarded by some as nation's finest runner (see page 45), buzzed around two turns in rabbit-quick tempo, sprinted 440 in 46.1 to break 12-year-old college record (46.2 by Illinois' Herb McKenley) in triangular meet with Rice and Texas A&M at Austin (May 1). Complained Eddie: "This is the worst I've felt in a long time. I didn't get this tired when I ran hard for four straight days."

Gary Heinrich, Hayward H.S. teen-ager who is busy rewriting interscholastic record book these days, churned water foamy white in 20-yard pool at Hayward, Calif., freestyling 200 yards in 1:54.5 and 440 yards in 4:30.2 (April 29).

BASEBALL—NEW YORK YANKEES, getting airtight pitching from Bobby Shantz and Bob Turley, home run blasts from Moose Skowron, held grip on American League lead but found Washington Senators, who took three out of four from Cleveland, Chicago, Kansas City, breathing hard on their necks as Indians and Baltimore moved up to challenge Athletics for third.

Chicago, Milwaukee and San Francisco dipped in and out of first place in National League like elevator in rush hour, were being pushed by Pittsburgh Pirates, who found Los Angeles' left-field screen easy pickings, won four out of five from Dodgers, and by Cincinnati Redlegs, who swept three from St. Louis, split pair with Cubs. At week's end, Cubs were in lead, with Pirates, Braves, Giants half-game behind and Red-legs only one game out.

TENNIS—PANCHO GONZALES, leading Aussie Lew Hoad 37-32 in world tour, lugged his big serve into Cleveland for national pro championships, turned it loose to sweep past weary Hoad 3-6, 4-6, 14-12, 6-1, 6-4 in final for his sixth straight title.

BASKETBALL—U.S. basketballers moved into Russian hinterland, gave Reds sample of how game should be played. Before 25,000 cheering Georgians (see below), who jammed Tiflis' outdoor Dynamo Stadium (once named for discredited Soviet secret police chief, Lavrenti Beria) and jiggled happily to barrage of American rock 'n' roll tunes (favorite: Too Pooped To Pop), AAU men trounced Azerbaijan champions 95-46 after female counterparts outscored Georgian All-Stars 42-37 for first victory on Soviet soil. Next day, 25,000 braved drenching downpour, watched U.S. men outskid Georgian All-Stars 59-41, women beat Estonia 43-34. Teams moved on to Leningrad's Winter Stadium, where Americans were pressed before defeating Leningrad All-Stars 76-72 for fifth straight; girls downed Russian Federation 54-44, Leningrad 58-42 to conclude tour with four straight.

Alex Hannum, who survived midseason dispute with dedicated Owner Ben Kerner to lead St. Louis Hawks to NBA title, last week took long, hard look at his basketball future, decided, "It is unprofitable to go back under the contract we have," confirmed his resignation after 16 months of sometimes turbulent big league coaching.

HORSE RACING—TIM TAM, Stepping neatly and boldly through Churchill Downs mud under gentle but firm urging of Ismael Valenzuela, swirled out of pack at head of stretch to bear down on front-running Lincoln Road—while Jewel's Reward was unable to get to third-place Noureddin and Silky Sullivan trailed badly in 12th place—pounded home first by half-length in $116,400 Kentucky Derby (see page 16).

Queen Elizabeth's pall mall, off at 20 to 1, swept into lead in last 50 yards, pranced uphill on Newmarket's Rowley mile straightaway to win 2,000 Guineas Stake, first of British season's major tests for 3-year-olds, add $38,967 to royal till.

TRACK & FIELD—CALIFORNIA'S DON BOWDEN, only U.S. miler to break four minutes, warmed up for major meets ahead, ran distance in 4:03.5, but suffered his first dual-meet defeat in two years when he was upset by Stanford's Ernie Cunliffe in 1:50.2 half-mile at Palo Alto.

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