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A worldwide roundup of the sports information of the week
May 19, 1958
RECORD BREAKERS—GARY HEINRICH, flipper-footed Hayward (Calif.) H.S. youngster who is rapidly becoming one of nation's best Olympic prospects, hauled down still another U.S. interscholastic swim record at Santa Clara, energetically splashing 440-yard freestyle in 4:28.5 (May 9).
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May 19, 1958

A Worldwide Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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RECORD BREAKERS—GARY HEINRICH, flipper-footed Hayward ( Calif.) H.S. youngster who is rapidly becoming one of nation's best Olympic prospects, hauled down still another U.S. interscholastic swim record at Santa Clara, energetically splashing 440-yard freestyle in 4:28.5 (May 9).

Russian weight lifters Stephan Ulyanov and VASILI STEPANOV huffed and puffed to new world marks at Alushta but were among missing when Soviet hefters (see page 27) arrived in U.S. for three matches against American muscle stretchers. Bantamweight Ulyanov lifted 241.5 pounds in two hands press, while Light Heavyweight Stepanov pressed 330.7 pounds (May 5).

Grigory Panichkin, hustling Russian heel-and-toer, gave able demonstration of man in hurry, wiggling to two world walking records in 48 hours. Panichkin ambled 10,000 meters in 42:18.3 at Stalinabad (May 7), two days later strolled 20 kilometers in 1:27:38.6.

BASEBALL—NATIONAL LEAGUE began to take on more familiar look as Milwaukee, with clutch-hitting assist from Catcher Del Crandall, swept pair from St. Louis, three from Cincinnati, moved into first place ahead of Pittsburgh and San Francisco. But both Pirates, with four straight over Philadelphia, and Giants, with streak of own against Pittsburgh and Los Angeles, stood ready to challenge Braves for lead. Chicago Cubs had misfortune to run into untracked Cards, bowed four times in row, slipped back to reality and fourth place.

New York Yankees, forced to sit idly by while rain fell, found Washington breathing ever so softly down their necks, so cooled off Senators by taking three out of four to stretch American League lead to 2� games. Baltimore, Detroit and Chicago were on rise, began to make threatening signs, but Yankee pitching gave Casey Stengel comfortable feeling of security.

BASKETBALL—U.S. men wound up Russian invasion in flurry of baskets, piled up 101-58 victory over Riga, Soviet national champion, at Leningrad, to complete six-game sweep. Back home after adulation by admiring Russians. Coach Warren Womble had praise for his AAU stars, described Russians as "strong drivers." attributed their lack of success to fact they "did not have the same training or finesse" as Americans.

SOCCER—BRITISH soccer fans, among most understanding in world, were staggered by word that triumphant Bolton Wanderers, who beat Manchester United in Cup Final, were stoned and pelted with tomatoes and flour-bombs by teen-age hooligans as they passed through Manchester and neighboring Salford on way to home-town celebration.

Ecuador soccer fans, too, demonstrated their understanding, 10,000 of them cheering Vice-President Richard Nixon after touring U.S. executive, stoned by Communist-led student demonstrators in Lima, Peru, showed up for match at Quito. Grinning Nixon won "vivas" from crowd with frank admission that his grade-school teammates urged him to give up soccer because "I didn't know how to use my head."

GOLF—HARVIE WARD JR., baby-faced San Francisco amateur who was set down for year for accepting unauthorized tournament expenses from Employer Ed Lowery, is back in good graces of USGA, will go after his third U.S. Amateur title next September. Happy over reinstatement, Ward looked ahead to future but admitted, "I'm afraid I kind of let my game go to pot."

Julius Boros, phlegmatic 38-year-old who hadn't won since he took golfing's richest prize at Tam O'Shanter in 1955, holed 10-footer on final green to stave off Cary Middlecoff by single stroke, captured Hot Springs (Ark.) Open with 273.

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