SI Vault
 
A worldwide roundup of the sports information of the week
June 02, 1958
RECORD BREAKERS—GLENN DAVIS, remarkable Ohio State jack-of-most-races, took off like hopped-up bunny, sped merrily around two turns on way to U.S. college record of 45.8 for 440 yards, also tied Jim Lea's world mark (around one turn) in Big Ten meet at Lafayette, Ind. (May 24).
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
June 02, 1958

A Worldwide Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

RECORD BREAKERS—GLENN DAVIS, remarkable Ohio State jack-of-most-races, took off like hopped-up bunny, sped merrily around two turns on way to U.S. college record of 45.8 for 440 yards, also tied Jim Lea's world mark (around one turn) in Big Ten meet at Lafayette, Ind. (May 24).

BASEBALL—SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS, flexing muscles like first-rate pennant contenders, were giving National League rivals fits and starts as they moved to 2�-game lead over Milwaukee Braves, who won two out of three from Giants but had less luck against last-place Los Angeles and Chicago.

New York Yankees continued to make shambles of American League, stretching winning streak to 10 before losing to Detroit, promptly won next two from Cleveland. Boston became latest to lead futile chase, trailed Yankees by nine games.

HORSE RACING—SEANEEN, plucky Irish-bred 4-year-old, lightweighted at 109 pounds, scampered away from top-weighted (130 pounds) millionaire Round Table, romped home by four handsome lengths in $108,300 Californian at Hollywood Park to set off lusty howl by too-sure bettors who backed favorite down to 1 to 9.

Lincoln Road, out from behind Tim Tarn's substantial shadow, hustled to front, beat off three separate runs by perky Talent Show to earn first big-money victory in $59,100 Jersey Stakes at Garden State. Commented relieved Jockey Chris Rogers: "I didn't have to look back for Tim Tam."

SOCCER—BROOKLYN'S EBBETS FIELD took on international look as touring Hearts of Midlothian, Scottish champions, outbooted England's Manchester City 6-5 before 20.000 (attention: Walter O'Malley) who braved downpour to watch game.

BOXING—HEAVYWEIGHTS were literally falling all over themselves to avoid consideration as contenders for Champion Floyd Patterson. Zora Folley, sent stumbling to canvas by low left hook in sixth, survived Art Swiden's taunts ("Come on, you bum!") and wild swings but hardly looked part of No. 1 challenger as he won 10-round decision at Las Vegas; Johnny Summerlin, with visions of title shot, ran into right-hand smash by hulking Nino Valdes in fifth, tumbled down and out at Detroit.

Matchmaker Billy Brown, who has been beating path to Grand Jury room in New York District Attorney Frank Hogan's continuing boxing investigation, became second (the first: Jim Norris) to desert sinking IBC ship, turning in his license to Commissioner Julius Helfand, who accepted it quicker than Brown could say Dominick Mordini (his real name). Complained Brown, who admitted to D.A. that he "talked in code" to Frankie Carbo: "I couldn't stand the smears I got from downtown."

TENNIS—LEW HOAD, power-hitting Aussie who has been hobbling around on ailing right leg for month, dropped his seventh straight match to Pancho Gonzales at Denver to trail 48-34, finally gave up, left pro tour to seek medical help at Los Angeles. His replacement: Ken Rose wall, who played role of patsy for Pancho last year.

BULLFIGHTING—BARNABY CONRAD, 36, author (Matador, La Fiesta Brava, The Gates of Fear), former U.S. vice-consul in Spain, onetime amateur bullfighter ("El Ni�o de California"), took time out to harass fighting cow on ranch near Madrid, found himself gored when he brought animal in too close on right-hand pass. Said Matador Conrad proudly from his hospital bed: "She put eight inches of horn into my left thigh, the same, place Manolete got it."

Continue Story
1 2