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25 YEARS OF ALL-STARS
July 07, 1958
When the first All-Star Game was played in 1933 it was tied in as a promotional device to Chicago's gala world's fair, The Century of Progress. A newspaper vote elected 18 players to each squad and named Connie Mack and John McGraw as managers. Babe Ruth hit a home run, and everything went beautifully. Even so, no one really expected the game to survive, and critics later actually called for its abandonment. But, as the pictures on these pages demonstrate, its perfection as a showcase for the great players and its habit of producing unforgettable moments caused it to flourish beyond all expectation, until now, as it celebrates its silver anniversary, it ranks second only to the World Series as baseball's great annual event.
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July 07, 1958

25 Years Of All-stars

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ALL-STAR

NATIONAL LEAGUE

PLAYER ROSTER

ANALYSIS OF TEAM STRENGTH

INFIELDERS

1B STAN MUSIAL (Cardinals No. 6). 37, 17th year, 15th All-Star (.320 in 50 AB). Season .359. Bats L.
2B BILL MAZEROSKI (Pirates No. 9). 21, 3rd year, 1st All-Star. Season .280. Bats R.
ss ERNIE BANKS (Cubs No. 14). 27, 6th year, 4th All-Star (.200 in 5 AB). Season .308. Bats R.
3B FRANK THOMAS (Pirates No. 15). 29, 8th year, 3rd All-Star (.000 in 2 AB). Season .299. Bats R.
1B GEORGE CROWE (Redlegs No. 15). 35, 6th year, 1st All-Star. Season .335. Bats L.
2B DON BLASINGAME (Cardinals No. 3). 26, 3rd year, 1st All-Star. Season .275. Bats L.
ss JOHNNY LOGAN (Braves No. 23). 31, 8th year, 3rd All-Star (.333 in 3 AB). Season .295. Bats R.
3B ED MATHEWS (Braves No. 41). 26, 7th year, 5th All-Star (.000 in 8 AB). Season .257. Bats L.

With a combined batting average of .310 and power oozing from every pore, the starting infield must rank as one of the most destructive ever assembled. Musial, Thomas and Banks are three of the big home-run hitters in the game and even Mazeroski has hit eight this year. As a unit, they have hit four times as many home runs as their American League counterparts and driven in almost twice as many runs. Not an outstanding defensive quartet, despite Mazeroski's silky brilliance, they are certainly steady and more than adequate. The second unit has two other big sluggers in Mathews and Crowe, a dependable if unspectacular player in Logan, and the little fireball, Blasingame, who can win ball games in an amazing number of ways. The National League infield has an impressive edge. [Right sign]

OUTFIELDERS

LF BOB SKINNER (Pirates No. 4). 26, 4th year, 1st All-Star. Season .321. Bats L.
CF WILLIE MAYS (Giants No. 24). 27, 7th year, 5th All-Star (.500 in 12 AB). Season .369. Bats R.
RF HENRY AARON (Braves No. 44). 24, 5th year, 4th All-Star (.429 in 7 AB). Season .282. Bats R.
LF WALT MORYN (Cubs No. 7). 32, 5th year, 1st All-Star. Season .260. Bats L.
CF RICHIE ASHBURN (Phillies No. 1). 31, 11th year, 4th All-Star (.556 in 9 AB). Season .336. Bats L.
RF LEE WALLS (Cubs No. 2). 25, 4th year, 1st All-Star. Season .307. Bats R.

Skinner is an extremely capable hitter--although a bit inadequate afield--who promises to provide some much-needed left-handed punch at the plate. And everyone knows about Aaron and Mays. But the former is just now hitting his accustomed stride after a prolonged slump and Willie, despite his still lofty average, is a long way from being the devastating slugger he was earlier in the year. Right now this outfield would have to be ranked well below some of the better ones of the past. Ashburn is always a fine ballplayer--but, with Mays around, where is he going to play? Which leaves Moryn and Walls, two good hitters having fine years but. not the kind of players to be considered great.

CATCHERS

DEL CRANDALL (Braves No. 1). 28, 8th year, 3rd All-Star (.000 in 1 AB). Season .286. Bats R.
BOB SCHMIDT (Giants No. 27). 25, 1st year, 1st All-Star. Season .267. Bats R.
JOHN ROSEBORO (Dodgers No. 8). 25, 2nd year, 1st All-Star. Season .261. Bats L.

Crandall, having his best year at the plate, has always been a masterful receiver with a very good arm. Schmidt and Roseboro are slumping hitters who lack Crandall's skill as a catcher, and Haney may choose to let him work the entire game. If so, the Nationals are sure to benefit from a competent job.

PITCHERS

JOHNNY ANTONELLI (Giants No. 43). 28, 9th year, 4th All-Star (4.50 ERA in 6 IP). Season 8-5. Throws L.
DICK FARRELL (Phillies No. 43). 24, 2nd year, 1st All-Star. Season 5-2. Throws R.
BOB FRIEND (Pirates No. 19). 27, 8th year, 2nd All-Star (0.00 ERA in 3 IP). Season 9-8. Throws R.
LARRY JACKSON (Cardinals No. 39). 27, 4th year, 2nd All-Star (0.00 ERA in 2 IP). Season 5-4. Throws R.
DON MCMAHON (Braves No. 20). 28, 2nd year, 1st All-Star. Season 6-1. Throws R.
JOHNNY PODRES (Dodgers No. 22). 25, 5th year, 1st All-Star. Season 7-7. Throws L.
BOB PURKEY (Redlegs No. 37). 28, 4th year, 1st All-Star. Season 8-4. Throws R.
WARREN SPAHN (Braves No. 21). 37, 14th year, 10th All-Star (4.50 ERA in 8 IP). Season 9-4. Throws L.

A few weeks ago the records of the National League pitchers would have been dazzling, but Spahn and Friend have recently been shaky, Purkey has become less effective and Podres seems unable to win on the road. Antonelli has been erratic all year. In fact the best pitching available to Haney would appear to center around the three relievers, the tough and determined pair of McMahon and Jackson and the fire-balling Farrell. There is also a good argument for sticking with the right-handers, since the starting American League lineup includes only two left-handed hitters-Fox and the switch-hitting Mantle--and it is from the left side that the latter has been having trouble all year. Should Haney gamble on the relief pitchers, his staff could give the American League power hitters a lot of trouble.

SUM-UP

Defensively this is far from an outstanding team, but the fielding is perhaps sound enough and in an All-Star Game, where both lineups are loaded with big hitters, defensive play is just not that important. And with one of the hardest-hitting infields ever assembled and great power potential from Aaron and Mays in the outfield, the Nationals definitely lack nothing at the plate. They are also assured of fine catching from Crandall. This is not a team with good speed, however, and the bench would hardly be called impressive. Which seems to place a tremendous load on a shaky group of pitchers. The key to the game may be Haney's decision whether to go along with the usually dependable but currently erratic starting pitchers (three of whom are left-handers) or take a chance on getting sharp two-and three-inning performances from his crew of brilliant right-handed relievers.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

PLAYER ROSTER

ANALYSIS OF TEAM STRENGTH

INFIELDERS

1B BILL SKOWRON (Yankees No. 14). 27, 5th year, 2nd All-Star (.667 in 3 AB). Season .290. Bats R.
2B NELSON FOX (White Sox No. 2). 30, 12th year, 8th All-Star (.294 in 17 AB). Season .332. Bats L.
SS LUIS APARICIO (White Sox No. 11). 24, 3rd year, 1st All-Star. Season .274. Bats R.
3B FRANK MALZONE (Red Sox No. 11). 28, 3rd year, 2nd All-Star (.000 in 2 AB). Season .302. Bats R.
1B MICKEY VERNON (Indians No. 8). 40, 18th year, 7th All-Star (.077 in 13 AB). Season .327. Bats L.
2B GIL MCDOUGALD (Yankees No. 12). 30, 8th year, 4th All-Star (.000 in 3 AB). Season .311. Bats R.
SS TONY KUBEK (Yankees No. 10). 21, 2nd year, 1st All-Star. Season .283. Bats L.
SS ROCKY BRIDGES (Senators No. 31). 30, 8th year, 1st All-Star. Season .305. Bats R.

The American League infield, in sacrificing batting strength for defensive excellence, may have sacrificed too much. While Skowron and Malzone are long-ball hitters, they do not carry the slugging credentials of their opponents, and certainly they lack the muscle to carry the weak-hitting little defensive star, Aparicio. Fox is a sharp, skillful batsman with a vast will to win, but he does not drive in very many runs. At the end of three innings, Stengel will undoubtedly substitute McDougald at short, which will improve the attack considerably while taking virtually nothing away from the skill afield. Vernon and Kubek furnish important left-handed pinch-hitting strength, and it is nice to see Rocky Bridges make his first All-Star team. But the National League infield, with its obviously superior power, is still the best.

OUTFIELDERS

LF BOB CERV (Athletics No. 33). 32, 8th year, 1st All-Star. Season .321. Bats R.
CF MICKEY MANTLE (Yankees No. 7). 26, 8th year, 7th All-Star (.286 in 21 AB). Season .268. Bats L-R.
RF JACKIE JENSEN (Red Sox No. 4). 31, 9th year, 3rd All-Star (.000 in 1 AB). Season .300. Bats R.
LF TED WILLIAMS (Red Sox No. 9). 39, 17th year, 14th All-Star (.333 in 39 AB). Season .300. Bats L.
CF HARVEY KUENN (Tigers No. 7). 27, 7th year, 6th All-Star (.182 in 11 AB). Season .321. Bats R.
RF AL KALINE (Tigers No. 6). 23, 6th year, 4th All-Star (.333 in 12 AB). Season .305. Bats R.
RF ELSTON HOWARD (Yankees No. 32). 28, 4th year, 2nd All-Star (.000 in 0 AB). Season .320. Bats R.

In some ways the most impressive thing about the starters is not their .300 average or heavy run production but the fact that they beat out Williams, Kaline and Kuenn for their jobs. Jensen and Cerv are the top men in the league in home runs and RBIs, while Mantle, despite a bad shoulder, has still managed to hit quite a few baseballs out of sight. Right-handed he has been deadly, which could be important should Spahn, Podres or Antonelli appear on the scene. In depth, the American League displays a marked superiority, with Williams always a tremendous All-Star performer and Kaline not far behind. Kuenn and Howard are valuable whether to pinch-hit or to play. It is the potential of the entire crew to break up the ball game with a barrage of home runs at any time that gives it a solid edge. [Right sign]

CATCHERS

GUS TRIANDOS (Orioles No. 11). 27, 6th year, 2nd All-Star (.000 in 0 AB). Season .280. Bats R.
SHERM LOLLAR (White Sox No. 10). 33, 13th year, 4th All-Star (.500 in 2 AB). Season .294. Bats R.
YOGI BERRA (Yankees No. 8). 33, 13th year, 11th All-Star (.233 in 30 AB). Season .227. Bats L.

Triandos, not quite in Crandall's class as a catcher, remains a more dangerous hitter. And behind him are two superb receivers, Lollar and Berra. Together, the three have far more homers and RBIs than the National Leaguers, and this power in depth gives them the edge. [Right sign]

PITCHERS

RYNE DUREN (Yankees No. 26). 29, 2nd year, 1st All-Star. Season 3-2. Throws R.
WHITEY FORD (Yankees No. 16). 29, 7th year, 4th All-Star (7.94 ERA in 5⅔ IP). Season 9-3. Throws L.
RAY NARLESKI (Indians No. 20). 29, 5th year, 1st All-Star. Season 9-5. Throws R.
BILLY O'DELL (Orioles No. 41). 25, 4th year, 1st All-Star. Season 8-8. Throws L.
BILLY PIERCE (White Sox No. 19). 31, 12th year, 5th All-Star (3.38 ERA in 10⅔ IP). Season 7-5. Throws L.
BOB TURLEY (Yankees No. 19). 27, 6th year, 3rd All-Star (0.00 ERA in 0 IP). Season 11-3. Throws R.
EARLY WYNN (White Sox No. 24). 38, 19th year, 5th All-Star (4.15 ERA in 4⅓ IP). Season 7-6. Throws R.

An All-Star pitching staff that can do without Detroit's Frank Lary and Jim Bunning must be loaded. This one is. The three Yankees--Turley, Ford and the rifle-armed relief pitcher, Duren--are having tremendous years, while Pierce, in recent starts, has been nothing less than sensational. O'Dell, Narleski and Wynn are three steady, dependable throwers. As is the case with their opponents, the American Leaguers will be facing a lineup loaded with right-handed hitters, but this should trouble them far less; lefties like Pierce and Ford don't seem to be having much trouble with anybody. As a group, Stengel's even pitchers make up a formidable array and they seem to rate a solid edge. [Right sign]

SUM-UP

An extremely well-balanced team, the 1958 American League lineup has good speed, defensive sharpness--particularly around the infield--impressive hitting and a very good bench. They are slightly inferior to the National League, in the starting lineup at least, so far as home-run potential is concerned but not at all to a marked degree. There are adequate replacements for starters at almost every position--in a few spots, as a matter of fact, the subs would even appear to be superior. And perhaps most important of all, Stengel almost certainly figures to have the better pitching staff. This is still the key to any baseball game and, with Turley, Ford, Duren, Pierce & Co. coming up to the All-Star contest at their peak, the American League may not need very many runs to win. On balance and depth and especially on pitching, they rate the nod. [Right sign]

When the first All-Star Game was played in 1933 it was tied in as a promotional device to Chicago's gala world's fair, The Century of Progress. A newspaper vote elected 18 players to each squad and named Connie Mack and John McGraw as managers. Babe Ruth hit a home run, and everything went beautifully. Even so, no one really expected the game to survive, and critics later actually called for its abandonment. But, as the pictures on these pages demonstrate, its perfection as a showcase for the great players and its habit of producing unforgettable moments caused it to flourish beyond all expectation, until now, as it celebrates its silver anniversary, it ranks second only to the World Series as baseball's great annual event.

THE ORIGINS
The first All-Star teams 1933

AMERICAN LEAGUE.
Front row: Eddie Collins (coach), Tony Lazzeri, Al Crowder, Jimmy Foxx, Art Fletcher (coach), Earl Averill, Ed Rommel (coach), Ben Chapman, Rick Ferrell, Sam West, Charley Gehringer, bat boy. Back row: Lou Gehrig, Babe Ruth, Oral Hildebrand, Connie Mack (manager), Joe Cronin, Lefty Grove, clubhouse boy, Bill Dickey, Al Simmons, Lefty Gomez, Wes Ferrell, Jimmy Dykes, clubhouse boy. Collins, Foxx, Gehringer, Gehrig, Ruth, Mack, Cronin, Grove, Dickey and Simmons were later elected to baseball's Hall of Fame. The American League won the first All-Star Game 4-2.

NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Front row: bat boy, Pepper Martin, Lon Warneke, Tony Cuccinello. Second row: Bill Hallahan, Dick Bartell, Bill Terry, Bill McKechnie (coach), John McGraw (manager), Max Carey (coach), Chick Hafey, Chuck Klein, Lefty O'Doul, Wally Berger. Back row: Gabby Hartnett, Jimmy Wilson, Frank Frisch, Carl Hubbell, Bill Walker (batting practice pitcher), Paul Waner, Woody English, Hal Schumacher, Pie Traynor, Andy Lotshaw (trainer). National Leaguers had special uniforms made for the game. Hall of Famers: Terry, McGraw, Hartnett, Frisch, Hubbell, Waner, Traynor.

THE GREAT PITCHERS

1934
Carl Hubbell and Lefty Gomez. In 1934 game Hubbell struck out Ruth, Gehrig, Foxx, Simmons and Cronin in succession. Gomez started five All-Star Games, was winning pitcher in three; no one else has won even two.

1937
Dizzy Dean, 26, gazes sadly at big toe broken by line drive in 1937 game. Injury led to the arm trouble that ruined his brilliant career.

1939
Bob Feller, only 20, is greeted (left) by Joe Cronin and Catcher Bill Dickey as he relieves in sixth inning after Nationals, losing 3-1, filled bases with one out. Feller threw just one pitch (center), got Arky Vaughan to hit into "fastest double play ever made"—Second Baseman Joe Gordon to Cronin (pivoting past runner Mel Ott) to First Baseman Hank Greenberg.

THE GREAT HITTERS SHOW OFF AT ALL-STAR TIME

1941
Youthful Ted Williams (he was only 22) laughs with delight after his three-run homer with two out in ninth gave American League 7-5 win.

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