SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: The readers take over
July 21, 1958
CHALLENGE ACCEPTEDSirs:I accept your invitation to identify the National Leaguers in the 1955 All-Star Game (WONDERFUL WORLD, July 7). They are: Willie Mays (5), Fred Haney (6), Duke Snider (7), Ted Kluszewski (8), Leo Durocher (9), Don Newcombe (10), Gil Hodges (11), Robin Roberts (12), Ernie Banks (13), Randy Jackson (14), Gene Baker (15), Red Schoendienst (16).JAMES FORSYTH JR. Upper Darby, Pa.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
July 21, 1958

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

CHALLENGE ACCEPTED
Sirs:
I accept your invitation to identify the National Leaguers in the 1955 All-Star Game (WONDERFUL WORLD, July 7). They are: Willie Mays (5), Fred Haney (6), Duke Snider (7), Ted Kluszewski (8), Leo Durocher (9), Don Newcombe (10), Gil Hodges (11), Robin Roberts (12), Ernie Banks (13), Randy Jackson (14), Gene Baker (15), Red Schoendienst (16).
JAMES FORSYTH JR.
Upper Darby, Pa.

?A hearty Pat on the Back to Mr. Forsyth for correctly identifying the All-Stars to the right of home plate above; also to Messrs. Tom Brier, Scranton, Pa.; Elliot Nehmad, Ventnor, N.J.; Bob Cardinal, San Francisco; John Fox, Dubuque, Iowa, and George Briggs, Eau Claire, Wis., who also replied correctly to the challenge. Alert readers readily spotted the Phillies' Robin Roberts in a Milwaukee warmup jacket, but missed Leo Durocher. The clue; white button on his cap, a significant feature of the Giants' headgear. But highest honors must go to SPORTS ILLUSTRATBD'S own Chicago advertising salesmen who pooled their knowledge to come up with the only correct identification of the triumvirate to the left: Umpire Bill Summers (3), Bat Boy Paul Wick (2) and Ball Boy Dave Williams (4).—ED.

HOT DOG!
Sirs:
A 21-Roman candle salute for your holiday recipe, Frankfurters Flamb� (SI, July 7). My family loved it—and I enjoyed cooking it. Now please allow me to give to you my own special frankfurter treat.

Boil three frankfurters and put through a food chopper. Then cut up one large onion and put through the chopper (this should make amount equal to the hot dog mix). Moisten the mixture by adding mayonnaise and mustard and/or a small amount of horse-radish. A dash of Worcestershire sauce is good, too, as are several chopped black olives. Spread on Melba toast rounds. Makes a delicious hors d'oeuvre.
JEAN MARTIN
San Francisco

Sirs:
A special hip-hip-hooray to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED for carrying the evolution of the popular dog one step farther! The scrumptious picture, those scrumptious recipes!

Now my family cheers me for the sizzling Frankfurters Flamb� I delivered for the holidays.
SALLY SALLAWAY
West Boylston, Mass.

Sirs:
I am willing to put up with your fashions and your recipes, but when I see a full-page color picture of a hot dog and then discover that your next week's cover story is "Educating Your Dog at Home," I'm ready to call it quits.
F. WAINWRIGHT BARNES
Huntington, N.Y.

HAPPY HAMS
Sirs:
Bill Leonard's The Battle of the Hams (SI, June 30) is an oasis in a desert of misinformation published in nonham magazines. Hams will doff their headphones to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED and Leonard for combining on the most readable piece on the hobby seen anywhere outside of publications devoted to it.

Any ham who has ever battered his way through a DX contest can thank Leonard for making it all seem plausible, exciting and even reasonable—something few amateurs can ever achieve with their neighbors, friends and wives in describing the miserable ecstasy of a DX contest.

More than that, Leonard's piece is probably the first faithful account written for the uninitiated that can be read by hams everywhere without wincing. Too often in the past, hams have been victimized by well-meaning writers who simply didn't understand what they wrote about.
D. F. MURRAY
W4RNP
Roanoke, Va.

Continue Story
1 2