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19TH HOLE: The readers take over
September 22, 1958
CONSERVATION: MAJORITY RULESirs:It is surprising that Bill Douglas, with his extensive legal experience and outdoor background, is opposed to the opening of that stretch of still unspoiled Pacific coastline to the motoring public! (A Hike for Posterity, SI, Sept. 8.)
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September 22, 1958

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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CONSERVATION: MAJORITY RULE
Sirs:
It is surprising that Bill Douglas, with his extensive legal experience and outdoor background, is opposed to the opening of that stretch of still unspoiled Pacific coastline to the motoring public! (A Hike for Posterity, SI, Sept. 8.)

Surely he knows that under our system of government the majority rules, and all who love the outdoors know that this majority insist on their God-given right to despoil Nature.

It would be unfair to require them to walk more than a half mile from their cars to decorate the landscape with beer cans, picnic scraps and broken bottles or to uproot shrubs, heave rocks at wildlife and start forest fires. So let's get the bulldozers rolling and start building hot-dog stands and souvenir shops without further delay!
DICK CARPENTER
Jenkintown, Pa.

Sirs:
Congratulations to Justice Douglas. I, too, think they have enough highways along the Washington coastline.

Let them put the superhighways where they really need them.
Mrs. EDWARD A. WOOD
Woodland Hills, Calif.

FLYING: AH, WILDERNESS
Sirs:
In your issue of August 25 you have a picture of a Cessna 180 equipped with floats (The New Age of Private Planes). Beneath the picture a paragraph explains, "With more than enough power to handle the extra drag, it lands and takes off easily on 'back-and-beyond' lakes and strips. The plane, as much as any other, has changed the Idaho Primitive Area from pack-in country to a weekending hunter's or fisherman's paradise."

The above paragraph may give to some the impression that landing aircraft on water or land within Wilderness or Primitive Areas in the National Forests is legal. To land aircraft within such an area is against the law and also violates the ideal under which these areas were set up.
ROBERT W. CERMAK
Quincy, Calif.

?Mr. Cermak is mistaken. Not only is it legal to land on any of the seven airstrips located in the million-acre Idaho Wilderness Area, but private planes make a far wider public use possible, without destroying the essential character of the preserve. In addition to two resorts on the Area's fringe—Sulphur Creek Ranch and Moose Creek Ranch—there are four Primitive fly-in resorts: Pistol Creek Lodge, Middle Fork Lodge, Flying B Ranch and the Jess Taylor Ranch. Those who administer the area welcome flying visitors, especially hunters who help keep the large Middle Fork of the Salmon deer herd, for which there is far too little grazing land, under control. Even with a limit of two bucks per hunter the Middle Fork herd is still "critically" dense.—ED.

FOOTBALL: THE FACTS
Sirs:
Several newspapers in the South have stated that Jimmy Phillips (A Free Ride for Big Red, SI, Aug. 25) was misquoted in your article.

I have much respect for your magazine. If your story is the correct one, then Phillips should be corrected. People lose faith when there are charges of misquotation.
JAMES A. GEROW
Burlingham, N.C.

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