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Victory and vindication
Charles Goren
September 29, 1958
From the ring of the cheers that echoed in the huge Viking Auditorium of Oslo's City Hall, you would have thought that Norway's own contract bridge team had won the European Championship. But, for the third successive year, the toasts at the victory banquet were for Italy's World Champions: Walter Avarelli, Giorgio Belladonna, Eugenio Chiaradia, Massimo D'Alelio, Guglielmo Siniscalco and Pietro Forquet.
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September 29, 1958

Victory And Vindication

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WEST

[Queen of Spades]
[Jack of Spades]
[10 of Spades]
[3 of Spades]
[Ace of Hearts]
[Queen of Hearts]
[10 of Hearts]
[9 of Hearts]
[7 of Hearts]
[4 of Hearts]
[2 of Hearts]
[Jack of Diamonds]
[2 of Diamonds]
[Club]

EAST

[Ace of Spades]
[9 of Spades]
[5 of Hearts]
[3 of Hearts]
[Ace of Diamonds]
[Queen of Diamonds]
[10 of Diamonds]
[8 of Diamonds]
[6 of Diamonds]
[3 of Diamonds]
[Ace of Clubs]
[King of Clubs]
[8 of Clubs]

When the French held the East-West cards, Trezel opened the West hand with four hearts and Jais promptly bid six hearts. By contrast, the Italians bid it this way:

WEST
(D'Alelio)

1 [Heart]
2 [Heart]
3 [Heart]
4 [Heart]
5 [Diamond]
5 [Spade]
PASS

EAST
(Chiaradia)

2 [Club]
3 [Diamond]
4 [Diamond]
4 [Spade]
5 [Heart]
6 [Heart]

As the Italians play their reverse bids, the first suit need not be genuine but the second is always playable. This is why East bid two clubs—a three-card suit—ahead of his diamonds, in which he held six. East's bid of four spades after game was reached was a cue-bid. When East finally got around to confirming the hearts, West showed his "extra" values in spades.

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