SI Vault
 
THE QUESTION: Is pro football lessening interest in college football?
Jimmy Jemail
October 27, 1958
ED REUTINGERDirector, football sales Wilson Sporting Goods Co. River Grove, Ill.No. They're different types of football. The pro game is wide open, with the forward pass the potent play. The college game is equally interesting because of its spirit, tradition, color and the loyalty of students and alumni.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
October 27, 1958

The Question: Is Pro Football Lessening Interest In College Football?

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

ED REUTINGER
Director, football sales
Wilson Sporting Goods Co.
River Grove, Ill.
No. They're different types of football. The pro game is wide open, with the forward pass the potent play. The college game is equally interesting because of its spirit, tradition, color and the loyalty of students and alumni.

PAUL ZIMMERMAN
President Football Writers Assn. of America
Pasadena, Calif.
No. Pro ball will add interest to the college game. This is being proved by the mounting attendance at all games, pro or college. Conversely, pro football would die without the colleges. In Los Angeles, our fans jam the stadiums for both.

GEORGE W. WILSON
Head coach
Detroit Lions
No, because the two games are so different. A fan who likes the tradition and color of college football will never desert the game for the pro league. He goes to see the pros only because of the college stars on the teams.

CARL B. ANDERSON JR.
Vice-President, An-Son Petroleum
Oklahoma City
It shouldn't, but it will. The pros, with the best players from college football, play a better game. What a paradox, the pros capturing interest from college football while being totally dependent on it for players.

PAUL CHRISTMAN
Former Cardinal quarterback
Chicago
Only to the pro fan. There are probably any number of college fans who have never been exposed to pro football and probably never will. But if a man goes to see the pros often enough he becomes a pro fan.

FRED STABLEY
President, College Sports Information Directors of America
East Lansing, Mich.
No. The Detroit Lions have sold over 40,000 season tickets. Yet the University of Michigan, 30 miles away, and Michigan State, 70 miles away, are doing near-capacity business. The decline of football in New York is due to other factors.

ELMER LAYDEN
Former coach at Notre Dame, former commissioner of pro football
Chicago
No. It is true that pro baseball took much of the interest from college baseball, but college baseball never was the attraction that football was and is. Crowds at college football games are larger than ever.

VICTOR F. OBECK
Athletic director
New York University
Yes. Because the caliber of pro football has improved so much in the last 20 years. However, this could prove a benefit to colleges. With the pressures of gate receipts off, the temptations of malpractice may disappear.

1