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In clover over there
Kenneth Rudeen
November 03, 1958
Thriving foreign automakers are busting buttons at London's big show this week—and eying the U.S. as eagerly as ever. Sports Illustrated here presents its own showing of new foreign cars
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November 03, 1958

In Clover Over There

Thriving foreign automakers are busting buttons at London's big show this week—and eying the U.S. as eagerly as ever. Sports Illustrated here presents its own showing of new foreign cars

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Britain's Lotus Elite Coup�, touring stablemate of Lotus racing cars, is based on an ingenious lightweight space frame, hugs the road like a limpet and can hit 125 mph. That's Designer-Builder Colin Chapman, 30, at the door.

Britain's Rolls-Royce silver cloud, here passing a Suffolk hunt group, has a mystical appeal for admirers of fine cars. It is silent, fast, nimble for a large car and meticulously made. Its price in the eastern United States is about $13,550.

Italy's Multipla, not to be confused with the small Fiat station wagon sold under the same name in the U.S., is a stylish carryall based on the Fiat 600 chassis.

West Germany's Borgward blossoms out with tail fins and two-tone coloring, reflecting American influence. The Isabella coup� above has a four-cylinder, 1.5-liter engine, can top 90 mph. More than a third of Borgward cars go to U.S.

East Germany's Wartburg, recently earmarked for export to U.S., has a three-cylinder engine of 900 cc. and is said to be capable of 85 mph. Under rigid quota system East Germany produced 35,597 cars in 1957; 1958 quota is 39,000.

Russia's Moskvitch shows that even that austere country is not immune to the spread of the two-tone paint treatment. This car has the look of a typical European machine; ZILs resemble prewar Packards.

Italy's Fiat 1100 contrasts sharply here with a centuries-old village street. The car is Italy's answer to Germany's enormously popular Volkswagen and France's pert Renault Dauphine. For Italianate quickness it rivals the cat at the rear wheel.

Italy's Fiat 1900 Gran Luce reflects the pattern of U.S. hardtop styling. It is a sporty version of the standard Fiat 1900 sedan, and is one of many special Italian cars based on mass-produced chassis.

Britain's Austin A40 Sedan-Wagon was Smartly styled by Italy's Farina. When the rear seats are folded the space behind the front seats becomes a cargo area.

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