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19TH HOLE: The readers take over
November 24, 1958
ELLIOTT: THE MAINSPRING OF SUCCESSSirs:I hope you have time for a little philosophical speculation. There is much to be learned from Don Connery's fine analysis of Herb Elliott's success (SI, Nov. 10), lessons very apropos to our own survival. The lesson: the goals Elliott has set are his own, they come from within himself.
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November 24, 1958

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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ELLIOTT: THE MAINSPRING OF SUCCESS
Sirs:
I hope you have time for a little philosophical speculation. There is much to be learned from Don Connery's fine analysis of Herb Elliott's success (SI, Nov. 10), lessons very apropos to our own survival. The lesson: the goals Elliott has set are his own, they come from within himself.

Here in America we live more and more by other people's goals. We are motivated by what we think others want us to do, by the values of the group we choose to live with. Call it other-directed (as does Sociologist David Riesman) or the organization man (as does FORTUNE'S William White) or the undiscovered self (as does Psychiatrist Carl Jung), it all boils down to the fact that we have surrendered our individualism for the safety and comfort of group thinking and group living. Unfortunately, great achievements come only from individuals whose purpose comes from within themselves, and this is as true of sports as it is of art, politics, religion or business.

Curiously enough, the Russians seem to have discovered this, for, despite their official drivel about the group supporting the individual, no political system makes greater demands on its individual citizens than theirs.
JOHN LYONS
Boston

Sirs:
Mr. Cerutty's methods are not new but are quite similar to those employed in training the great Australian Thoroughbred Phar Lap. Those who saw him run in the Agua Caliente Handicap long ago will still maintain Phar Lap was the best horse ever to run on this continent. Although a horse has no character to build, I think that training (no matter how) and winning is a matter of promise and fulfillment to one's self and one's self alone. To put one's mind to achieving something and then doing it, as the Australians are doing in all sports, shows "character" as that word should be known.
FRED H. MILLER JR.
Newport Beach, Calif.

MAGIC SHOVEL (CONT.)
Sirs:
Attached is a $5,000 check for Billy Morton's stadium in Dublin.

I wish there was some way in which we could arouse the Irish in this country to put up another $100 to $500 apiece.

I thought you might like to send this to Billy personally, since you initiated the matter through your articles (Mr. McDonongh's Magic Shovel, SI, July 22 and 29).
BERNARD P. McDONOUGH
Parkersburg, W.Va.

?The check (see picture) having been duly delivered, Billy Morton, sports promoter extraordinary and Hon. Sec, Clonliffe Harriers, responded from Dublin as follows:

"I find it almost impossible to express how much my colleagues and I, in our club, appreciate this wonderful gesture from Bernard McDonough. I would like you to believe me when I say this: we are all dumbfounded.

"I can assure you that the name Bernard McDonough will be remembered as long as Clonliffe Harriers exist, and rightly so.

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