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THE YEAR OF LONESOME GEORGE
Roy Terrell
December 15, 1958
This magazine's peripatetic football reporter reviews the fun and trends he witnessed during 10 very lively weekends
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December 15, 1958

The Year Of Lonesome George

This magazine's peripatetic football reporter reviews the fun and trends he witnessed during 10 very lively weekends

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"Maybe it added to spectator interest," says Duffy Daugherty, "but it sure didn't eliminate tie games. We had our first tie game since 1948."

"It had less influence than I expected," says Dodd. "We tried one and our opposition tried one and neither had any effect on the result."

"Teams tried for two points early in the season," says Michelosen, "then went back to kicking the single point."

And Royal, an outspoken foe of the rule since its inception because he felt it would put added pressure on the coach, now has to admit that it didn't quite work out that way.

No season is perfect, of course, and there are minor complaints about this one. If the new offensive tactics are to receive any assistance from the rules makers, even more liberal substitutions is undoubtedly needed, perhaps a complete return to two-platoon football. It might also be fun to put those goal posts up on the goal line. "We can't follow the pro game," says Bobby Dodd, "unless they let us play by pro rules."

It would also be pleasant to see the Pacific Coast Conference—or the various remnants of it—smooth out its differences and organize a sensible, representative intercollegiate football league on the West Coast. If the Ivy League is going to continue to play Navy and Syracuse and Penn State—and Rutgers and Buffalo-then the Ivies should be allowed to hold spring training, as every coach in the conference annually recommends. Army should be allowed to play in bowl games. Navy and the Air Force do.

There was a growing and unhappy trend among many players to disregard the sort of respect they should instinctively give to officials; and many otherwise excellent coaches, forgetting their responsibility to young pupils, were allowing them to get away with these displays of bad manners on the field.

But then, maybe you wouldn't want a season in which everyone was happy. Otherwise there wouldn't be anything to argue about until the next September.

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