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19TH HOLE: The readers take over
December 15, 1958
WE FINALLY MADE ITSirs:I was one of the 57,557 people privileged to witness the most electrifying football game ever played in Baltimore, Maryland.
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December 15, 1958

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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WE FINALLY MADE IT
Sirs:
I was one of the 57,557 people privileged to witness the most electrifying football game ever played in Baltimore, Maryland.

The people came, and sat, and cheered because Baltimore is a hungry city, starved for an athletic championship.

There is, indeed, a love affair in town (Love Affair in Baltimore, SI, Dec. 1). Actually, it is more of an adoration, a near idolatry. Marchetti, Donovan, Berry, Ameche, Unitas, Moore—oh that magnificent Lenny Moore! These names and all the rest are carefully discussed down on the waterfront, on playgrounds, in taverns, offices, clubs—everywhere. It is the conversation.

Seconds after the final gun signaled a 35-27 championship win over the 49ers, thousands of delirious rooters flooded the playing field to carry every Colt they could find to the locker room.

And these fans, these ecstatic, patient, hungry fans of Baltimore, not only screamed and cheered; many literally wept. For after all the years of defeat, near misses and frustration, they thought reverently, "We made it. My God, we finally made it!"
BOB GELLMAN
Baltimore

ENTERTAINMENT A.E.
Sirs:
Roy Terrell's Best of the Toughest (SI, Nov. 24) was the most accurate and authentic account of the Big Ten football situation written in years.

Those alumni of Iowa who remember the B.E. days—before Evashevski—appreciate the task that confronted him and, more so, appreciate the way he and his staff went about tackling the seemingly impossible task.

As for entertainment, as mentioned by Mr. Terrell, one couldn't ask for better quality than that offered by the Iowa team and the Big Ten.
RAYMOND TERFLER
Davenport, Iowa

THE THIRD LEAGUE
Sirs:
While thumbing through the pages of your Nov. 24 issue I was somewhat surprised to see the familiar countenance of my father, a member of the New York Baseball Committee (Baseball Coattails on Fire).

You might be interested to know that Clint Blume, a former president of the Real Estate Board of New York and now heal of his own company, was also a member of John McGraw's 1922 World Champion New York Giants.

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