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GIANTS BID FAREWELL
Steve Wulf
October 27, 1992
FANS RUN AMOK AFTER LAST GAME AT POLO GROUNDS
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October 27, 1992

Giants Bid Farewell

FANS RUN AMOK AFTER LAST GAME AT POLO GROUNDS

NEW YORK FALLS TO PIRATES, 9-1, IN FINALE

NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 29, 1957—In the end, at least, a Thomson touched 'em all.

As darkness fell over the Polo Grounds on Sunday evening, alter most everybody had left the park, Nancy Thomson, age 5, retraced her daddy's famous trot around the bases. Off to the first base side, Bobby Thomson, who fired the Shot Heard 'Round the World here, shot the bittersweet scene with his home movie camera. "Just one last waltz around the dance floor," said Thomson.

It's hard to believe that only three years after their world championship, six years after Thomson hit the home run to defeat the Brooklyn Dodgers in their epic playoff, 67 years after moving into the Polo Grounds and 75 years after materializing in New York, the Giants are going, going...gone.

But they are, and they played their last game today under Coogan's Bluff in front of a crowd of 11,606 that embodied a prism of emotions: sorrow, rage, gratitude, greed, indignation, denial. Bowing to sentimentality, Giant manager Bill Rigney put as many of the '51 and '54 Giants on the field as he could find, and they ended up bowing to the Pittsburgh Pirates 9-1. At 4:35 p.m., '54 World Series hero Dusty Rhodes grounded to Pirate shortstop Dick Groat, who threw to first baseman Frank Thomas for the final out, and with that, the San Francisco-bound Giants ran for their lives toward the centerfield clubhouse ahead of a stampede of jilted New Yorkers.

Having failed to capture any living souvenirs, the fans turned their attention to such inanimate objects as seats, bases, grass, the pitching rubber, the bullpen shelter. Once the looting had subsided, many of the followers gravitated toward the rightfield stands, where a banner implored: STAY TEAM STAY. Yelling toward the Giants' clubhouse, the fans at first called for the man who's taking their team away, owner Horace Stoneham, no doubt to demonstrate a phonetic spelling of his last name. Then they pleaded to say goodbye to the Say Hey Kid, but Willie Mays sensibly declined. Finally, the fans serenaded the Giants with a ditty to the tune of The Farmer in the Dell:

"We hate to see you go,

"We hate to see you go,

"We hope to hell you never come back—

"We hate to see you go."

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