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SHORT BY A NOSE
Rick Reilly
October 27, 1992
A chilling suppositional saga from the annals of the NFL
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October 27, 1992

Short By A Nose

A chilling suppositional saga from the annals of the NFL

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Dallas's victory that day proved, of course, to be Pyrrhic. Though a few of those Cowboys were able to turn that great triumph into postfootball careers—notably Senator Lance Rentzel—the team drooped. The Cowboys looked miserable in losing that Super Bowl II to the Oakland Raiders and didn't see the playoffs again for many years. By 1990, when the club moved to Jacksonville, the Cowboys had not even sniffed another Super Bowl.

As for poor Jerry Kramer, he never lived down his infamous sneeze. Signs were planted in front of his house ( KRAMER NEEDS TO BLOW), and six months later the Packers traded him to Baltimore. He lasted only two more years in the league and was virtually invisible except for a series of TV ads for Contac cold capsules. "If I had known about Contac," Kramer said in the commercials, "I might be in the Hall of Fame today."

The last anybody saw of Kramer, he was living in a motel on the outskirts of Atlanta. The day he disappeared, he left only one clue, the beginnings of an autobiography. He had gotten only as far as the title: Nobody Nose the Trouble I've Seen.

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