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Baseball
Tim Kurkjian
November 30, 1992
Why did the Phillies protect shortstop Juan Bell, who, according to one American League general manager, was the major league's worst player in 1992, while the White Sox didn't protect his brother, George, one of baseball's top run producers? That question was one of a thousand being asked before the start of the National League expansion draft last week in New York City. Almost eight hours later, after the Florida Marlins and the Colorado Rockies, who will take the field for the first time next April, had selected a total of 72 players and made six trades, there were hundreds of new questions—including, Who the heck is Andres Berumen?
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November 30, 1992

Baseball

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At this rate, soon. Jackson, 30, has been with six teams in his career, four in the last year. (The record in this century is 10 teams, shared by pitchers Ken Brett and Bob Miller and outfielder Tommy Davis.) The Marlins drafted Jackson and then traded him 90 minutes later to the Phillies. He's one of those guys who looks good when he's on another team because he's lefthanded and throws hard, but he doesn't look so good when he's on your team (his record the last three years was 15-24). The Rockies were also set to draft Jackson and trade him to the Phillies, but the Marlins beat them to it.

9) What happens to some of the players who were expected to be drafted but weren't?

They may be traded. Cub shortstop Shawon Dunston, who missed most of last season with a back injury, was expected to be taken by Florida and then traded to the Royals. When the Marlins asked for three prospects in return, the deal died. Look for Dunston and his three-year, $9 million contract to be dealt. Also on the block are Yankee first baseman-DH Kevin Maas, Expo outfielder Ivan Calderon and one of the Cardinals' two second basemen, Jose Oquendo and Luis Alicea.

10) Who the heck is Andres Berumen?

He's a 21-year-old righthander drafted in the second round by Florida from Kansas City. He hasn't pitched above Class A and is the most obscure of the many obscure young players chosen. But that's what expansion drafts are about: rolling the dice on unknowns and hoping you cash in a few years down the line. After all, Jim Clancy was no household name in 1976 when he was drafted by the expansion Blue Jays. Fifteen years later he finished his major league career with 140 wins.

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