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Scorecard
Edited by Jack McCallum
May 09, 1994
Brocco, No Bull
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May 09, 1994

Scorecard

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Sportin' Bands

The link between the world of sports and the world of pop music (SCORECARD, Feb. 28) continues. Tim McGraw, a son of former big league reliever Tug, tops the country charts with his brazenly un-P.C. hit Indian Outlaw. The cloyingly catchy song, which includes such lyrics as "You can find me in my wigwam/I'll be beating on my tom-tom," has drawn heavy criticism from Native American groups, but McGraw, whose father was known for his irrepressible enthusiasm, says that he's "flabbergasted" by all the attention and that he means no disrespect with the song. He actually said that some of his best friends are Native Americans.

Drawing less controversy—and fewer sales—is Bud Collins, a Frank Zappaesque band from the University of Connecticut named, for no apparent reason, after the smooth-pated tennis commentator. Also from courtside: Bettie Serveert, an Amsterdam-based quartet whose name derives, with a little topspin, from that of former Dutch tennis star Betty Stove. Stove has an instructional TV series airing in Holland that's entitled Bettie Serveert, which means "Betty Serves" in Dutch. Says drummer Berend Dubbe of the band's name, "It's very stupid, but it is too late to change it."

And there's still another tennis connection: A German band with the unsavory name of Run-Over Schoolchildren was recently ordered to pay Steffi Graf $35,000 in damages for using lyrics suggesting that she had an incestuous relationship with her father. A court in Karlshruhe, Germany, threw out an appeal by the four-member band of a ruling in Graf's favor last year. The offending lyrics were included in the song (which was later banned in Germany) called I Wanna Make Love with Steffi Graf.

Of much gentler stuff is the homage paid by two other bands to a pair of former New York Mets. Yo La Tengo, which is not a mariachi band but a Hoboken, N.J.-based alternative-rock group popular with college audiences, takes its name from Elio Chacon, the shortstop for the original 1962 Mets, who was given to shouting, "Yo la tengo!" (Spanish for "I got it!") whenever he prepared to catch a pop-up. And a four-member rock group is named after Chacon's lovably incompetent teammate at first base. If you're ever in Cincinnati, we urge you to check out Throneberry.

[This article contains a table. Please see hardcopy of magazine or PDF.]

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