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Love and Love
Sally Jenkins
March 13, 1995
He's beaten his demons, he's won over Brooke Shields. Could Andre Agassi be all grown up?
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March 13, 1995

Love And Love

He's beaten his demons, he's won over Brooke Shields. Could Andre Agassi be all grown up?

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Gilbert believes Agassi should win six Grand Slam titles in the next three years. "He's out there for all the right reasons." Gilbert says. "He's not out there for his dad or for Nick or the show. He's out there to take something for himself."

Whatever Agassi does next, it likely will be improbable. "My career seems full of things I should have done and didn't, and things I shouldn't have done and did," he says. "I've given people what I felt. Sometimes it was professionalism, sometimes it was showbiz, and sometimes it was downright bad attitude."

As Agassi steers Juanita through the desert, there is one thing that, for all of his wealth, stature and self-awareness, he does not have at this moment. A phone.

Juanita points down a steep grade and suddenly shudders and groans to a halt. Agassi works her gears without result. He hops out and peers under her front grille, oblivious to the fact that all of Juanita's tonnage is pointed straight downhill at his cropped little head. He climbs back in. "Um, you don't by any chance have a cellular, do you?" he asks.

True to form, Agassi has done the impossible. Surrounded by miles of empty desert, he has driven Juanita over a four-foot pole inexplicably sticking up from the Mojave gravel. Juanita is stuck. "I don't believe this," he says. The lights of Las Vegas glow four miles distant. Agassi reluctantly climbs out of the cab, turns up his collar and hikes into the darkness.

But wait, this is Andre Agassi. So after just a hundred-yard hike, he finds a guy napping in his truck before starting the late shift at an all-night store. The guy wakes up to find one of the world's most famous athletes tapping on his window, begging for a ride home.

The journey, however, is not over. During his times alone in Las Vegas, Agassi is a restless nocturnal creature, a frequenter of midnight features and all-night diners. But this night is young; it's only 8 p.m. Agassi grabs the keys to his Infiniti and sets out for dinner at a small but exquisite Italian joint in a Vegas strip mall. As he relaxes from his desert trauma, he begins to marvel at the odds against this night's particular misadventure.

Who else could take you on such a ride? "Do you realize," he asks, his voice rising with sudden delight, "what you've been a part of?"

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