SI Vault
 
TO OUR READERS
Mark Mulvoy
March 27, 1995
Much as we strive to provide timely and incisive sports coverage in the pages of SI, some of our readers inevitably look to us for even more. Two new excursions into cyberspace are helping us meet those expectations. In January we joined forces with CompuServe to give subscribers to that on-line service electronic access to the magazine's current fare and archival material, as well as the ability to communicate with other fans and SI staff members. By clicking on CompuServe's sports icon, users can feast on a full menu of offerings from SI, including articles and selected photos from the issue currently on newsstands; the text of past articles, dating back to the 1980s; a gallery of classic photos from our pages; a catalog from which sports clothing and other gear can be ordered; a fans' interactive forum; plus the latest sports news, scores and statistics. Also available are all the stories from special issues commemorating the championship seasons of Nebraska, Penn State and the San Francisco 49ers.
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March 27, 1995

To Our Readers

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Much as we strive to provide timely and incisive sports coverage in the pages of SI, some of our readers inevitably look to us for even more. Two new excursions into cyberspace are helping us meet those expectations. In January we joined forces with CompuServe to give subscribers to that on-line service electronic access to the magazine's current fare and archival material, as well as the ability to communicate with other fans and SI staff members. By clicking on CompuServe's sports icon, users can feast on a full menu of offerings from SI, including articles and selected photos from the issue currently on newsstands; the text of past articles, dating back to the 1980s; a gallery of classic photos from our pages; a catalog from which sports clothing and other gear can be ordered; a fans' interactive forum; plus the latest sports news, scores and statistics. Also available are all the stories from special issues commemorating the championship seasons of Nebraska, Penn State and the San Francisco 49ers.

All of this is literally at CompuServe users' fingertips. For example, college basketball fans with personal computers can read about the upsets at the NCAA basketball tournament in Jack McCallum's story on page 32 of this issue and then summon stories about shockers in other years. They also can access up-to-the-minute news about the teams still in the hunt for Final Four berths and exchange insights, opinions and predictions with other basketball enthusiasts.

Those whose thirst for sports information is still not sated are invited to visit SI's home (address: http://pathfinder.com/si) on the World Wide Web, a branch of the Internet that links computer users to all manner of material. Among the features available to NCAA hoops fans at our Website are a continuously updated tournament draw sheet with scores of games in progress, game recaps, a TV tournament schedule, team rosters and a rundown of each team's tournament history. Other features currently available include a collection of nostalgic spring training photos and every Yogi Berra "They Said It" we've ever run. Soon SI's Website presence will be enhanced by an electronic version of our SCORECARD section featuring sound and video.

Our spots on CompuServe and the Internet were designed by director of design/new media Steve Hoffman, senior editor Richard Demak and associate editor Stefanie Scheer, with help from editorial coordinator for new media Peter Kay, project director Michele Lifshen, photo researcher Miriam Marseu and CD-ROM project manager Liz Lesnick. The magazine's CompuServe venture was negotiated by director of development Steve Zales and manager of new business development Phil Polishook.

We believe our new computer services complement the magazine rather than compete with it. "If you want the full package of dramatic photography and in-depth reporting, the magazine is the place to go," says Hoffman. "But if you want to look at one particular article or just stats or check back more than once a day on what's happening in sports, then on-line is the thing."

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