SI Vault
 
Diamonds To Ice
Edited by Alexander Wolff and Christian Stone
April 10, 1995
Chris Drury, Boston University's freshman winger, may be the most famous Little Leaguer in recent memory (above), but he isn't the only one to abandon the base paths for the blue lines. In last Saturday's NCAA hockey final, Drury faced Maine forward Brad Purdie, the starting shortstop for the Canadian entry in the 1984 Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pa. Drury, who had two assists in the Final Four, closed out his inaugural college-hockey season in familiar style: arms held high in triumph, just as they had been when he pitched the U.S. to victory in the 1989 Little League World Series. Purdie, Maine's leading goal-scorer this season, with 29, settled for NCAA runner-up, better than the fourth place he helped the Canadian team gain in the '84 series. "The Korean players arrived at 6 a.m., and they were out doing calisthenics at 8," recalls Purdie of the team that defeated the Canadians in Williamsport. "Then the guy threw a no-hitter at us. It wasn't as exciting as this."
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April 10, 1995

Diamonds To Ice

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Chris Drury, Boston University's freshman winger, may be the most famous Little Leaguer in recent memory (above), but he isn't the only one to abandon the base paths for the blue lines. In last Saturday's NCAA hockey final, Drury faced Maine forward Brad Purdie, the starting shortstop for the Canadian entry in the 1984 Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pa. Drury, who had two assists in the Final Four, closed out his inaugural college-hockey season in familiar style: arms held high in triumph, just as they had been when he pitched the U.S. to victory in the 1989 Little League World Series. Purdie, Maine's leading goal-scorer this season, with 29, settled for NCAA runner-up, better than the fourth place he helped the Canadian team gain in the '84 series. "The Korean players arrived at 6 a.m., and they were out doing calisthenics at 8," recalls Purdie of the team that defeated the Canadians in Williamsport. "Then the guy threw a no-hitter at us. It wasn't as exciting as this."

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