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Navigating The Web
Mark McClusky
July 03, 1995
With the overwhelming amount of information available on the Internet, the biggest problem is locating whatever it is you're looking for. The easiest way is to use the World Wide Web, a graphical Internet interface that even the most hardened critic of digital technology can quickly grow to appreciate.
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July 03, 1995

Navigating The Web

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With the overwhelming amount of information available on the Internet, the biggest problem is locating whatever it is you're looking for. The easiest way is to use the World Wide Web, a graphical Internet interface that even the most hardened critic of digital technology can quickly grow to appreciate.

Sports fans will find the Web most useful for two things—instant access to updated scores and news, and in-depth information on particular teams or sports. Here are some Web sites to get you started:

Perhaps the most comprehensive Web site for sports news is ESPNET SportsZone (http://espnet.sportszone.com/), a joint venture between ESPN and Paul Allen's Starwave Corp. This site provides news stories, commentary from ESPN broadcasters, updated scores, audio interviews with athletes, statistics and more. All this information makes SportsZone very popular—it is visited by 45,000 users a day.

The News and Observer of Raleigh, N.C., provides another top news service, The Sports Server from NandO (http://www2.nando.net/sptsserv.html). The News and Observer has been a leader in adapting its news-gathering resources for use on the Internet. It provides staff-written stories, wire service reports, scores and information, largely statistical, on every team in baseball, football and pro basketball. There is also the SI Web site (http://www.pathfinder.com/si/welcome.html), which, in addition to current and classic stories from the magazine, offers a photo gallery and an archive of They Said Its.

Beyond those journalistic ventures the Web is home to sites of hundreds of teams, sports organizations and businesses providing what is often billed as inside information or comprehensive team reports but what often amounts to press releases. Fans also have their say at sites created by and for people who root for the same team.

One Web directory, in fact, lists almost 2,000 sports-related sites. Thankfully, there are indexes to this sea of information. The World Wide Web of Sports (http://www.tns.lcs.mit.edu/cgi-bin/sports) lists links to other sites relating to sports. Just by clicking you can reach sites for many teams and sites focusing on such esoteric sports as Ultimate Frisbee or Australian Rules football.

The NFL (http://nflhome.com) and big league baseball (https://www2.pcy.mci.net/mlb/index.html) already offer official Web sites, and the other major leagues are soon to follow. Even the NHL Players' Association (http://www.nhlpa.com/) is on the Web.

And if you decide to take in a game the old-fashioned way, you might want to know where you'll be sitting. To do that, just check out the stadium and arena info page (http://www.wwcd.com/stadiums.html).

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