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Correct Course
John Garrity
July 17, 1995
Tom Weiskopf's Senior Open win will not divert him from the business of course design
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July 17, 1995

Correct Course

Tom Weiskopf's Senior Open win will not divert him from the business of course design

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Clearly Weiskopf is a man for whom sustaining accomplishment is less important than pursuing new goals. "You know," he says, "you can hit great long irons—and that was my strong suit, long irons—but after a point, how many great long irons are you going to continue to hit?"

O.K. So why play?

Weiskopf has his reasons. Clients like to see him on television, wearing his trademark white cap and making trouble for Lee Trevino and Raymond Floyd. More important, his wife and his mother, Eva, still love to watch him play. At Congressional he wore a pink ribbon—the symbol of the fight against breast cancer—in support of Jeanne, who has undergone a lumpectomy, radiation and chemotherapy since a malignant tumor was discovered last August. Tears welled in Tom's eyes as he walked up the 18th fairway on Sunday, demons dispersed and victory assured. "I'm a sentimental guy," he said after greeting his wife with a heartfelt kiss. "This one was for her."

Before his win Weiskopf sounded determined to invest no more than his occasional presence to tournament golf, but that could change. He clearly enjoyed flying home with the trophy while Nicklaus gave the second-place interviews. "I will probably play more now," Weiskopf said. "I can still do it, yes, I can still win." But quitting—really quitting—remains in his plans, either after the British Open at Troon in '97 or after St. Andrews in 2000. And, he says, there will be no looking back, "because now I have something that gives me the same emotional uplift that winning golf tournaments gave me."

How ironic. The ultimate trophy, at roughly 150 acres, wound up being too big for Weiskopf's den.

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