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SPENDING SPREE
September 04, 1995
Readers were impressed with the on-field rushing of Indianapolis Colt running back Marshall Faulk (Babying Himself, July 24) and wished him well. But many were concerned that Faulk is also rushing to spend the $17 million he will earn in his seven-year contract. "I can imagine how difficult it is for someone coming from such a tough background to adjust to the lifestyle of an NFL star, but Faulk needs to slow down a bit," advised 17-year-old Ryan Wing of Provo, Utah. "Buying 11 cars isn't the way for a 22-year-old to spend his money," added Nick Cox of Juneau, Wis. David G. Speck of Alexandria, Va., wrote that several years ago he participated in an NFL program that provided financial education and advice to players, particularly young ones. (The program was abandoned, Speck said, because some of the financial advisers "were doing too much selling of their own services.") Speck wrote of the athletes: "These are young men with relatively short careers, high earnings and little or no experience in managing their incomes. How many times do we have to read about great stars who are now down and out because they spent everything they earned and thought it would never end?"
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September 04, 1995

Spending Spree

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Readers were impressed with the on-field rushing of Indianapolis Colt running back Marshall Faulk (Babying Himself, July 24) and wished him well. But many were concerned that Faulk is also rushing to spend the $17 million he will earn in his seven-year contract. "I can imagine how difficult it is for someone coming from such a tough background to adjust to the lifestyle of an NFL star, but Faulk needs to slow down a bit," advised 17-year-old Ryan Wing of Provo, Utah. "Buying 11 cars isn't the way for a 22-year-old to spend his money," added Nick Cox of Juneau, Wis. David G. Speck of Alexandria, Va., wrote that several years ago he participated in an NFL program that provided financial education and advice to players, particularly young ones. (The program was abandoned, Speck said, because some of the financial advisers "were doing too much selling of their own services.") Speck wrote of the athletes: "These are young men with relatively short careers, high earnings and little or no experience in managing their incomes. How many times do we have to read about great stars who are now down and out because they spent everything they earned and thought it would never end?"

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