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BURY THE HATCHET
September 18, 1995
Readers unanimously agreed with us that it is time for major leaguers to get over their resentment of former replacement players (INSIDE BASEBALL, Aug. 7). Clarissa L. Guillory of Lafayette, La., wrote that "if it weren't for replacement players, there would not have been a season this year." Ross Lockhart of New Martinsville, W.Va., said the Padres were wrong to have voted not to recall replacement player Ira Smith from Triple A. "If they would take a look," Lockhart wrote, "another productive bat in their lineup wouldn't hurt. Other than Tony Gwynn, who on the Padres can claim, as Smith can, to be hitting over .300 and driving in 40 or more runs?" J.L. Combs of Phoenix agreed, saying it was sad that some teams were not committed to putting the best players on the field. Edd Utley of Signal Mountain, Tenn., wrote of the vindictive major leaguers, "This is the same group of spoiled millionaires who crossed the umpires' picket line this spring and in the past have ignored strikes by concession workers. And they have the gall to call someone else a scab. Thank god football is here!"
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September 18, 1995

Bury The Hatchet

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Readers unanimously agreed with us that it is time for major leaguers to get over their resentment of former replacement players (INSIDE BASEBALL, Aug. 7). Clarissa L. Guillory of Lafayette, La., wrote that "if it weren't for replacement players, there would not have been a season this year." Ross Lockhart of New Martinsville, W.Va., said the Padres were wrong to have voted not to recall replacement player Ira Smith from Triple A. "If they would take a look," Lockhart wrote, "another productive bat in their lineup wouldn't hurt. Other than Tony Gwynn, who on the Padres can claim, as Smith can, to be hitting over .300 and driving in 40 or more runs?" J.L. Combs of Phoenix agreed, saying it was sad that some teams were not committed to putting the best players on the field. Edd Utley of Signal Mountain, Tenn., wrote of the vindictive major leaguers, "This is the same group of spoiled millionaires who crossed the umpires' picket line this spring and in the past have ignored strikes by concession workers. And they have the gall to call someone else a scab. Thank god football is here!"

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