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Another World
Rick Reilly
December 11, 1995
Corey Pavin won the $1 million first prize in Sun City, where life is just too good to be true
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December 11, 1995

Another World

Corey Pavin won the $1 million first prize in Sun City, where life is just too good to be true

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He didn't have to contend with Pavin in those shindigs, and on Sunday the man they call Jockey was about as catchable as a cheetah. He never made a bogey. Come to think of it, he went the last 45 holes without making one. His victory put a nice little candle on a chocolate-filled-pastry kind of year—winning the U.S. Open, playing heroically at the Ryder Cup and now this. "We've been saving up to build a house [in Orlando]," he said. Must be some house. In the past six weeks he has made $265,500 for a second-place tie at the Tour Championship, $225,000 at the Grand Slam of Golf, $240,000 at the Skins Game and now this. That's $1.73 million playing in fields of 30, four, four and 12, respectively. "I guess we'll have a little left over now," he said.

One man's shack is another man's mansion. Meet Moses Dlidli, the 28-year-old sublet to Pavin's caddie, Eric Schwarz. As Pavin spoke to the media, Dlidli was giving Schwarz a hearty handshake. Schwarz had promised Dlidli for three years running that if his man ever won Sun City, he would pay him $3,000 out of his $100,000 take. "I figured he'd buy himself a car," said Schwarz. "He's never had one." Actually, nobody in Dlidli's family has owned a car, and he has a 30-minute walk to his job as a caddie each day at Sun City.

But Dlidli had his sights on more than that. He wanted a new house of his own. He lives in a one-room tin shanty in Ledig, a few miles beyond the chrome glare of Sun City. It has no kitchen, no bathroom, two kids, his girlfriend and, on one wall, a giant poster of Pavin.

On Sunday, Dlidli handed the bag over to Schwarz on the 1st tee and for the next four hours worked the edges of the gallery, not breathing over putts, looking to the sky on chips and all the while praying Zulu prayers. His prayers were answered.

Dlidli said he would build a four-room house—two bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room, with an outdoor toilet. As he talked he kept trying to pull the hat over his face to hide his par-5 grin and the tears that would soon follow. No such luck.

"I am so happy," Dlidli said. "So, so happy."

Said an emotional Schwarz, "A house for three thousand bucks? This is pretty cool!"

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