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...Buyer's Guide
John Garrity
February 12, 1996
1Look beyond the word titanium. The titanium revolution is about oversize heads, not titanium-threaded grips or bag tags. Some companies offer low-priced "titanium" drivers but use ti only in the hosel or in face inserts. If these clubs perform well—and there's no reason why they shouldn't—it's not because of their tiny titanium content.
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February 12, 1996

...buyer's Guide

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1
Look beyond the word titanium. The titanium revolution is about oversize heads, not titanium-threaded grips or bag tags. Some companies offer low-priced "titanium" drivers but use ti only in the hosel or in face inserts. If these clubs perform well—and there's no reason why they shouldn't—it's not because of their tiny titanium content.

2
Don't let titanium's gleam blind you to a club's design. "The magic isn't in the metals," says Ram's Jim Hansberger, "it's in the engineering." In other words, a well-designed stainless steel club is better than a poorly engineered titanium club.

3
Go for the bigger club heads. Unless you're a low handicapper who can work the ball, you have little to gain by dropping a bundle on a mid-size ti with a shaft that is shorter than 45 inches. Ask for a head in the 240-260 cc range.

4
Take a test drive. You'll probably like the feel and forgiveness of titanium, but before you spend hundreds, face the fact that ti won't cure your slice. As Ping's John Solheim says, "The biggest technical innovation is to get a better golf swing."
—John Garrity

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