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To Tell the Truth
Steve Rushin
February 19, 1996
The more O.J. talks, the less doubt he leaves about how we will remember him
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February 19, 1996

To Tell The Truth

The more O.J. talks, the less doubt he leaves about how we will remember him

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Of course the true financial beneficiaries of his ex-wife's murder are members of her family. "Who has benefited most by all of this?" Simpson asked on his radio House Party. "It's quite obvious.... There are a few members of [Nicole's] family who are now better off financially and materially."

Yet, somehow it is Simpson who is being sued. So he has given a deposition in which he testifies that he "never...slapped, hit, strangled, choked, beat or hurt" his ex-wife, though he concedes that the couple had occasionally "rassled." Of course some of our finest Americans rassled, from Abe Lincoln to Hulk Hogan, which may be why Simpson told BET, "If all American families were like my family, this country'd be a lot better place."

Sure, he cracked the windshield of a Mercedes with a baseball bat once after speaking with Nicole, but "I wouldn't characterize this as an argument," he said in the deposition. "We were having a discussion." For those who think he abused his ex-wife—such as his ex-wife, who said so in her diary—well, they're deeper in denial than Moses ever was.

After all, Nicole was "the love of my life" he said on the radio, while dedicating the Mariah Carey and Boyz II Men duet One Sweet Day to her. He sniffled as it played and plugged the video six times. Privately that same week, Simpson gave his deposition, calling Nicole a liar and linking her to "drugs" and "hookers."

Fame is a vapor, popularity is an accident and money takes wings. The only thing that endures is character. "I never forgot it," said O.J. Simpson.

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