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Question of Balance
Jaime Diaz
March 11, 1996
Greg Norman always had all the shots, but his win at Doral proves his head is now in the game too
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March 11, 1996

Question Of Balance

Greg Norman always had all the shots, but his win at Doral proves his head is now in the game too

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During the session Norman also determined that "something caved in on the inside of my driver—it just went dead." He phoned his wife, Laura, and instructed her to bring a handful of drivers via helicopter. Norman picked out a new titanium-headed model that he had never used and played the last round with it. "I missed only one drive," he said later.

Ultimately the club that won the tournament was Norman's putter. He needed 101 putts and over the 72 holes missed just once from inside six feet. Norman used 23 putts in the final round, the most impressive a 20-footer for birdie on the 14th that gave him the lead moments after he had heard a roar from the 15th, where Bradley had holed a 20-footer for par. The clincher came at the 17th, where Norman holed a 30-foot chip for a birdie—his seventh in 11 holes—and a three-stroke cushion. It marked the third time in his last three victories in the U.S. that Norman had holed out from off the green during the final four holes.

To elevate himself beyond the stains of good player to great, Norman will have to add to his two major championships. The most obvious void in his record is a victory in the Masters, long a cauldron of self-imposed pressure. To win at last at Augusta, he will have to make good on his vow to resist trying to prove anything to anyone. "I'm just trying to get nicely balanced," says Norman.

If he can follow the Doral model, in five weeks Greg Norman's career might be significantly easier to assess.

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