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MASTERS ANNIVERSARIES
Rick Lipsey
April 08, 1996
The 1996 Masters is destined for greatness. How can we be sure? Because history has told us so. Although the Masters celebrates its 60th anniversary next week, the major championship we know didn't really begin until the first postwar playing 50 years ago. From then on, something special has occurred every fifth year.
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April 08, 1996

Masters Anniversaries

The 1996 Masters is destined for greatness. How can we be sure? Because history has told us so. Although the Masters celebrates its 60th anniversary next week, the major championship we know didn't really begin until the first postwar playing 50 years ago. From then on, something special has occurred every fifth year.

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This was the only major in which Jack Nicklaus made three eagles and was still beaten by 11 strokes. The man who left Nicklaus, and everybody else, in his wake was Ray Floyd, who set or tied more records (11) in his wire-to-wire romp than anyone in the tournament's history. Floyd's records included:

•Low first round by a champion: 65.
•Low 36-hole score: 131.
•Low 54-hole score: 201.
•Low 72-hole score: 271 (tie).
•Consecutive holes making no more than 4:52 (streak started in 1975).
•Best performance on par-5s: 14 under (tie).
•Holes under par: 23 (22 birdies, one eagle).

Floyd won by eight shots over Ben Crenshaw, but that was not a record, because someone had already won by nine. Can you guess who?

Hint: The same man who in '65 set the 271 total mark that Floyd tied.

Answer: Jack Nicklaus.

Shark Sighting
1981

When a 26-year-old Greg Norman played in his first Masters, he already had earned a reputation as one of the world's great young talents by virtue of his 15 international titles—none in the U.S. "Just being here is probably the greatest thrill of my life," Norman said after an opening 69, which tied him for the lead. "When I turned pro, my ambition was to play Augusta National."

Were it not for a killing double bogey at the 10th on Sunday, Norman might have been able to beat Tom Watson, who won his second green jacket. Norman finished fourth but showed that he would be a force in the future. "With his platinum-blond Prince Valiant hairdo," wrote Herbert Warren Wind in The New Yorker, "Norman looks more like a surfer than a golfer, but...[he] should do very well if he decides to campaign in this country."

One for The Ages
1986

At the tender age of 46, Jack Nicklaus won his record sixth Masters with a come-from-behind charge that was as emotional for him as it was for his adoring fans. "I sort of welled up four or five times coming in," said Nicklaus, wiping away the tears at the awards ceremony.

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