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Letters
May 06, 1996
If Kentucky is good enough to earn the championship, why can't it earn the respect it deserves?COURTNEY TOMES, CANEYVILLE, KY.
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May 06, 1996

Letters

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If Kentucky is good enough to earn the championship, why can't it earn the respect it deserves?
COURTNEY TOMES, CANEYVILLE, KY.

NCAA Championships
Your article on Kentucky's national-championship game was outstanding photographically (The Untouchables, April 8), but the text was disappointing. The brief photo captions did more to convey the essence of this closely fought game than did the rambling discourse about coach Rick Pitino and Kentucky basketball history.
DAVID GYMBURCH, Lee Center, N.Y.

Your first sentence says, "They scarcely celebrate their national championships at Kentucky." Although the Wildcats had long been favored by many to win the title, cheers could be heard everywhere around the state when they won. In some places the fans celebrated all night, waving pom-poms and setting off fireworks. In Lexington fans spent the night in line so they could see Kentucky players at the pep rally the following night. All the tickets were given out within an hour or two, and some people paid up to $50 to get their hands on those "free" tickets. Do you consider this "scarcely celebrating"?
TIM DOCKERY, Louisville

Enough already! Let Kentucky celebrate. You've bashed the school, you've bashed the team, you've bashed the coach, and now, when Kentucky wins its sixth championship to cap a stellar season, you bash the Wildcats' fans.
JOHN S. REED, Louisville
T. RICHARD RINEY, Goshen, Ky.

Congratulations to Kentucky on winning the national championship, but what about Syracuse? No one gave the Orange a chance in the NCAA tournament, but the team played its heart out and got into the title game. Sorry, Tony Delk, but John Wallace should have gotten the Most Outstanding Player award.
TIM KALKA, Endicott, N.Y.

I can't believe there were nine pages of Kentucky coverage compared with two pages on the win by the Tennessee women over Georgia (Four on the Floor). Not only did the Lady Vols win their fourth championship, but coach Pat Summitt, having led Tennessee to four crowns in 10 years, now trails only John Wooden in NCAA basketball titles.
PEGGY A. JACKSON, Orlando

As an avid hockey fan, I am disappointed that you printed not a single word about Michigan's overtime victory in college hockey's national-championship game. I didn't expect the Wolverines' win to get the cover over the NCAA basketball tournament, but certainly their first NCAA hockey title in 32 years deserved a story. There is nothing better in sports than a sudden death overtime goal in hockey, especially for the national championship, and you missed it!
PAUL J. MORGAN, Rockwood, Mich.

I know you guys didn't miss it. The evidence is on your contents page (April 1). One picture of one match along with a small caption regarding the NCAA wrestling championships in which coach Dan Gable led Iowa to its 16th team title. These dedicated wrestlers work hard to compete at this level, yet SI chose to ignore them and instead devoted two pages to Michael Irvin's off-the-field association with drugs and "self-employed models" (Dropping the Ball). Who dropped the ball this time?
DAVID DIVELY, Middletown, N.Y.

Jack Berrill
It was with deep regret that I learned of the recent death of Jack Berrill, creator of the Gil Thorp comic strip (SCORECARD, April 8). Having served as New Milford ( Conn.) High guidance director through the 1960s and early '70s, I was privileged to play a minor role in the strip when one of the characters was referred to a Mr. Newman for counseling. The fictitious Milford High was modeled after the school where I worked, which some of the Berrill children attended during the years the family lived in New Milford. Jack was both a personal friend and a frequent caller when he needed information about high school atmosphere, anecdotal events and particularly the role of guidance.

Both in athletics and in the basic mores of decent and responsible behavior, our teenagers have lost a beloved and respected mentor.
PAUL J. NEWMAN, Carlsbad, Calif.

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