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Scorecard October 14, 1996
Edited by Richard O'Brien and Franz Lidz
October 14, 1996
Bungled Alomar Decision...Notre Dame Shakes Up Women's Soccer...Death of a Sherpa...Sports Mutual Fund...A Yankee Belle?...Land-Speed-Record Run Slowed
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October 14, 1996

Scorecard October 14, 1996

Bungled Alomar Decision...Notre Dame Shakes Up Women's Soccer...Death of a Sherpa...Sports Mutual Fund...A Yankee Belle?...Land-Speed-Record Run Slowed

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Even Lou Holtz would envy the achievements of Notre Dame's 34-year-old women's soccer coach, Chris Petrucelli. Since he took over a two-year-old program in 1990—the same year Carolina won the fifth title in its streak—Petrucelli has gone 119-16-8 and has twice been named national coach of the year. And now he has twice knocked the tar out of the Tar Heels. His team's 23-game winning streak is causing a stir in South Bend. "When people think of Notre Dame, they think of football," says junior midfielder Holly Manthei. "But for the past year, we've been the team on campus."

Spare Us

Since those prehistoric days when Fred Flintstone converted a 7-10 split by having his ball cleaved in two in mid-alley, bowling has been forever evolving. Here are two recent post-Bedrock trends:

To attract the young and hip, a Wisconsin bowling center installed two indoor beach volleyball courts. To attract the dazed and confused, the Brunswick Corp. unveiled Cosmic Bowling, in which keglers aim at fluorescent pins through a fog of smoke, strobes and thumping heavy-metal music.

Next thing you know they'll replace the beer frame with the decaf-latte frame.

Lopsang's Last Climb

The porters who live on the high southern slopes of the Himalayas share the clan name Sherpa. They are the backbone of every expedition to Mount Everest, lugging gear and setting ropes through the ice fields. Over the last four years Lopsang Jangbu Sherpa has reached the 29,028-foot summit of Everest four times, each time without supplemental oxygen. During the last of those assaults, in May, the 23-year-old Kathmandu native sat on the roof of the world a record three hours.

That expedition turned out to be the deadliest in the mountain's history. A severe and sudden storm trapped Lopsang's party as it descended. Eight people died, including Scott Fischer, the American group leader. Lopsang had tried to save Fischer, who was sickened and stupefied by the thin air. But Fischer refused help and threatened to throw himself off the mountain. Reluctantly, Lopsang plunged through the blinding snow alone. Fischer's frozen body was found the following day. "Scott was Lopsang's hero," says their friend Jane Bromet. "After the tragedy Lopsang became a living link to Scott."

The link died when Lopsang returned to Everest last month with a German team and an avalanche buried him and two other climbers at 25,590 feet. Lopsang's body vanished beneath the snow. To those who have conquered Everest and seek to conquer it again, the mountain grows neither less majestic nor more merciful.

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