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Public Enemy No. 1
Tim Kurkjian
October 14, 1996
Apologies and postseason heroics have not been enough to resurrect the reputation of Roberto Alomar
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October 14, 1996

Public Enemy No. 1

Apologies and postseason heroics have not been enough to resurrect the reputation of Roberto Alomar

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How did he do it? How did he keep his focus while playing under such a cloud of controversy and intimidation? "Because he has been in baseball all his life, his instincts for the game are unbelievable and he let them take over," said Orioles outfielder B.J. Surhoff. "He's tough mentally."

Alomar will be booed throughout the playoffs, and probably into next season. He might also lose some of his endorsements, but at week's end none of the companies he represents, including Reebok, whose batting gloves and shoes he endorses, has pulled back. His Reebok deal runs through 1997, and the company has told Boggs that it is standing behind Alomar.

Will people forgive him? "As time goes on, I think so," Brady Anderson said. "When they see how remorseful he is, how much he wants to atone. It happens all the time in sports. Look at [Yankees] Dwight Gooden and Darryl Strawberry. It was great to see them come back. Richard Nixon had to resign, but in his last days he was beloved. People will forgive Robbie if they haven't already."

"Robbie tried his best to apologize, but people won't let him," Parent said. "I'm so happy for him right now. He's a great player, one of the best ever. I just hope that his career lasts long enough so that people will forget this."

There are those who will never forget what Alomar did to Hirschbeck. But there are also a great many who will never forget Game 4, when, once again, he became a hero.

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