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Roll Call
Alan Shipnuck
November 03, 1997
In Las Vegas all that counted was where your name ended up on the final money list
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November 03, 1997

Roll Call

In Las Vegas all that counted was where your name ended up on the final money list

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Quigley, a 28-year-old rookie, had played nine straight weeks to get within striking distance of the top 125 and seemed to be running out of gas midway through his round, bogeying the 10th and 11th holes to fall back to a tie for 28th. Lancaster's grin could've lit up the Strip, but it disappeared as Quigley birdied the 13th, 14th and 15th. "That's it—I'm out of here," Lancaster said. He stayed, of course.

Quigley birdied his fourth straight hole at 16, jumping into a tie for 15th. After a flurry of calculations, Lancaster found a glimmer of hope. "All I need is one bogey," he said. He got it from Quigley on the 17th, where he three-putted from 40 feet. No more than 10 seconds after Quigley's score was posted, the phone rang in the back of the pressroom, and someone asked if there was a Neal Lancaster in the house. "That's my wife," he said, before purring into the phone, "I think we're O.K." Quigley's tie for 23rd left him 128th on the list, about $7,000 short of Lancaster, who was last seen sprinting out of the pressroom pumping his fist and promising a proper celebration when he got back to Carolina and his wife, Lou Ann.

Lancaster was also happy because he didn't have to answer to Andrade's mom. Andrade had been grinding hard in a failed attempt to make the Ryder Cup team. Exhausted, he slipped to 30th on the money list in the weeks following the PGA. "It didn't bother me as much as it did my mom," Andrade said. "I thought she was going to have a coronary." On the eve of the final round in Vegas, Andrade was still feigning indifference to the money machinations, but he came clean after losing his spot in the Tour Championship with a closing 69. "Coming down the stretch, there was more pressure than trying to win a tournament," Andrade said. "I'm so glad to have this behind me. I've been on the bubble for two months."

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