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The Shag Bag
February 23, 1998
Brace Yourself: How to follow up the most lucrative season ever by a female golfer? Annika Sorenstam changed everything. She appeared at the Los Angeles Women's Championship in new Nike shoes, with new Callaway X-12 irons, hitting a new ball, the Maxfli Revolution—and hardly anyone noticed. Press, players and fans alike were agog at her new braces. "I can't eat pizza, potato chips or com on the cob," said a smiling Sorenstam, who tied for sixth in LA, two shots behind winner Dale Eggeling. Maybe Sorenstam's arms were tired: She's spending an extra half hour each day brushing and flossing.
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February 23, 1998

The Shag Bag

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Brace Yourself: How to follow up the most lucrative season ever by a female golfer? Annika Sorenstam changed everything. She appeared at the Los Angeles Women's Championship in new Nike shoes, with new Callaway X-12 irons, hitting a new ball, the Maxfli Revolution—and hardly anyone noticed. Press, players and fans alike were agog at her new braces. "I can't eat pizza, potato chips or com on the cob," said a smiling Sorenstam, who tied for sixth in LA, two shots behind winner Dale Eggeling. Maybe Sorenstam's arms were tired: She's spending an extra half hour each day brushing and flossing.

Clinton's Brain: Asked what golf advice he would give President Clinton, sports psychologist Bob Rotella says, "If he were one of my pro players, I would say, 'Don't play. Deal with your personal problems first.' When I saw that he was playing golf the other day, I thought, You've got to be kidding."

Lee's Not Pleased: If the old guard gets its way, chairman of the PGA Tour policy board Richard Ferris might be on his way out. In testimony at the Casey Martin trial Ferris said the Senior tour, on which carts are legal, "is not competition at its highest level. The Senior torn-is nostalgia." That left several Seniors, including Lee Trevino (left), steamed. "If that's what he said, he doesn't deserve to be on our board," Trevino said at last week's GTE Classic, where he came in nine shots behind winner Jim Albus. "We're out there playing for blood."

Beats the Weather at Pebble: The New York Times reports that the Siberian equivalent of golf features six-foot corkscrews and the heady taste of worms. "If there is a pastime here to compare to the American male's seemingly bottomless love of golf, it is undoubtedly ice fishing," the Times reports from Tomsk. Russian men huddle on frozen rivers, use huge corkscrews to cut holes in river ice, and keep bait worms warm by storing them in their mourns. "If you had ever done it even once, you wouldn't have to ask why," says one Tomskovite.

Dirty Dozen; Jarmo Sandelin of Sweden was seven under during last week's Alfred Dunhill South Africa PGA in Johannesburg. One hole later he was one over. With his ball in a bank of plants, Sandelin took what a local reporter called "eight stabs and sclaffs" and made an octuple-bogey 12.

Reckless Driver: Many golfers have noticed that titanium drivers tend to strike sparks when they brush against rough or sandy soil. "Titanium is flammable," says Clay Long, vice president of research at Cobra Golf. "What happens is that a little bit of the metal at the surface actually bums." Long warns users not to practice their swings at the gas station or anywhere else near combustible fumes. "That wouldn't be smart at all," he says.

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