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The X-Factor
Tim Crothers
March 23, 1998
Lost amid the ashes of a heinous offensive season in '97 (.223, seven homers) was the fact that Bret Boone set a major league record for fielding percentage by a second baseman. But while his .997 glovework earned him a place in the record books, his bat could land him on the bench. Boone, 28, must hit at least .280 this year for a lineup that has little more for pitchers to fear than Barry Larkin and Reggie Sanders. Before '97 Boone was a career .261 hitter with some pop (55 homers in six seasons). If he can regain that touch, the Reds suddenly become dangerous. Well, a little.
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March 23, 1998

The X-factor

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Lost amid the ashes of a heinous offensive season in '97 (.223, seven homers) was the fact that Bret Boone set a major league record for fielding percentage by a second baseman. But while his .997 glovework earned him a place in the record books, his bat could land him on the bench. Boone, 28, must hit at least .280 this year for a lineup that has little more for pitchers to fear than Barry Larkin and Reggie Sanders. Before '97 Boone was a career .261 hitter with some pop (55 homers in six seasons). If he can regain that touch, the Reds suddenly become dangerous. Well, a little.

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