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Cameron Morfit
May 25, 1998
How Sweet It Was Clayton (Candy Man) Heafner was known for his lumpy physique and the fattening job he had held in a Linville, N.C., candy factory. He was also celebrated for his plainspoken ways. Sizing up one amateur's game, he said, "The pros are built like truck drivers but have the touch of hairdressers. You are built like a hairdresser and have the touch of a truck driver." At the 1940 San Francisco Open, Heafner was the subject of a memorable ruling when he found his lost ball in a spectator's pocket. The fan said he had retrieved the ball from a tree. Tournament officials, flummoxed, ruled the incident "an act of God" and assessed no penalty. Heafner went on to win five Tour titles and finish second in two U.S. Opens. His sweetest victory came 50 years ago this month at the 1948 Colonial, when he melted Skip Alexander and the Wee Ice Mon, Ben Hogan, by six shots.
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May 25, 1998

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How Sweet It Was
Clayton (Candy Man) Heafner was known for his lumpy physique and the fattening job he had held in a Linville, N.C., candy factory. He was also celebrated for his plainspoken ways. Sizing up one amateur's game, he said, "The pros are built like truck drivers but have the touch of hairdressers. You are built like a hairdresser and have the touch of a truck driver." At the 1940 San Francisco Open, Heafner was the subject of a memorable ruling when he found his lost ball in a spectator's pocket. The fan said he had retrieved the ball from a tree. Tournament officials, flummoxed, ruled the incident "an act of God" and assessed no penalty. Heafner went on to win five Tour titles and finish second in two U.S. Opens. His sweetest victory came 50 years ago this month at the 1948 Colonial, when he melted Skip Alexander and the Wee Ice Mon, Ben Hogan, by six shots.

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