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Catch a Rising Range Rat
June 01, 1998
Before they were famous, they were faces in the crowd, kids with a pipe dream shared by thousands of junior golfers. They wanted to be tour pros. Unlike the rest of the crowd, these six—two Floridians, two Californians, a Texan and an Arizona Pee-Wee superstar—had the power, touch and perseverance the job requires. Can you identify them?
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June 01, 1998

Catch A Rising Range Rat

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Before they were famous, they were faces in the crowd, kids with a pipe dream shared by thousands of junior golfers. They wanted to be tour pros. Unlike the rest of the crowd, these six—two Floridians, two Californians, a Texan and an Arizona Pee-Wee superstar—had the power, touch and perseverance the job requires. Can you identify them?

After skipping his Little League All-Star game to play golf, this San Diegan won the American Junior Golf Association Tournament of Champions in 1986, '87 and '88.

The son of the head pro at Florida's Timuquana Country Club copped the '89 Rolex Tournament of Champions and U.S. Junior and was AJGA player of the year.

A three-time Florida junior champ, she won the U.S. Girls' Junior in '87 After graduating from Rosarian High in West Palm Beach, she went straight to the LPGA.

A two-time Texas junior champ and AJGA All-America, he fell in the quarterfinals of the '89 U.S. Junior but joined Trip Kuehne to win the La Paloma Team Championship.

A three-time U.S. Junior champ, twice AJGA player of the year, he shot 48 for nine holes at age three. At the '92 L.A. Open, the 16-year-old missed the cut.

He won the Arizona Pee-Wee Open at seven and the Junior World title at nine, but as a teen he lost in the third rounds of the '83 and '84 U.S. Juniors.

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