SI Vault
 
The Shag Bag
June 22, 1998
O'Meara-proofing? After 14 months of denying that Augusta National needs to be toughened up, or Tiger-proofed, club officials announced last week that Tom Fazio will modify the course in time for the 1999 Masters. Fazio will lengthen the par-5 2nd hole by 25 yards, bringing a bunker on the right side of the fairway back into play; raise the green at the par-4 11th to create a new, difficult pin placement behind the pond in the back left corner; cut down the mounds on the right side of the landing area on the par-5 15th to keep drives from hitting them and bounding down the fairway; and add 15 yards to the par-4 17th, lengthening it to 415 yards. No word on whether Augusta will replace its famed peach cobbler dessert with more challenging crab-apple pie.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
June 22, 1998

The Shag Bag

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

O'Meara-proofing? After 14 months of denying that Augusta National needs to be toughened up, or Tiger-proofed, club officials announced last week that Tom Fazio will modify the course in time for the 1999 Masters. Fazio will lengthen the par-5 2nd hole by 25 yards, bringing a bunker on the right side of the fairway back into play; raise the green at the par-4 11th to create a new, difficult pin placement behind the pond in the back left corner; cut down the mounds on the right side of the landing area on the par-5 15th to keep drives from hitting them and bounding down the fairway; and add 15 yards to the par-4 17th, lengthening it to 415 yards. No word on whether Augusta will replace its famed peach cobbler dessert with more challenging crab-apple pie.

No Parking: Se Ri Pak (below) wound up 38th at the Oldsmobile Classic but got a pleasant surprise when Samsung, her primary sponsor, sent her a golf bag emblazoned with her name. Her correct name. Until last week he bag misidentified South Korea' national hero as Se Ri Park.

Casey Who? "Confidence is fickle thing," said new Nike tour superstar Doug Dunakey, who had plenty of it after shooting a 59 two weeks ago. He tied for second that week, but last weekend, brimming with consistency, Dunakey closed with a pair of 65s to win the Cleveland Open.

What a Way to E-Z-Go: According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, 25 people have died in golf cart accident since those funny cars first appeared. The government will soon require seat belts, headlights and other safety features in all carts capable of doing 15 mph.

Beware Wolf: Don't be surprised if Blackwolf Run in Kohler, Wis., produces black moods at the July 2-5 U.S. Women's Open. Based on the early buzz—Ernie Els predicts four-putts for the women on the ticklish greens at Blackwolf, which also has Olympic-quality rough—there'll be oodles of scores in the 80s.

Rotten Apple: In a stirring charge to avoid last place, New York City edged Richmond, Va., in a recent ranking of America's golf cities. Gotham finished 308th on the list, based largely on public course availability, behind golf meccas Duluth, Minn., and Rapid City, S.D.

See You in Court: Senior player Rocky Thompson, who uses a long putter, says banning the device would be "absurd." According to him the USGA is "a bunch of old men who don't like to see people playing better. They want golf the way it used to be, but Eve got news for them. It won't be." Thompson knows what he will do if the Over-the-Far-Hills gang outlaws his putter: "Approach the most affluent law firm I can find."

1