SI Vault
 
Should Major League Baseball Ban Andro?
November 09, 1998
YESLet's hope a desire not to tarnish the record set by homer hero Mark McGwire (above), an androstenedione popper, isn't clouding the vision of the officials who are investigating grounds for a ban. Baseball should follow the NCAA and the NFL and outlaw it. We don't know what long-term side effects andro has, but we do know that, like anabolic steroids, it jacks up testosterone levels. Comparing this drug to red meat, as some defenders do, is not unlike comparing an outboard motor to a sail.—Kostya Kennedy
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
November 09, 1998

Should Major League Baseball Ban Andro?

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

YES
Let's hope a desire not to tarnish the record set by homer hero Mark McGwire (above), an androstenedione popper, isn't clouding the vision of the officials who are investigating grounds for a ban. Baseball should follow the NCAA and the NFL and outlaw it. We don't know what long-term side effects andro has, but we do know that, like anabolic steroids, it jacks up testosterone levels. Comparing this drug to red meat, as some defenders do, is not unlike comparing an outboard motor to a sail.
—Kostya Kennedy

OR

NO
Athletes and millions of others ingest lots of substances on which no extensive testing has been done, including creatine, the previous muscle-building flavor of the month. I hope hero-worshipping kids don't pop The pill, but andro-using adults have every right to take a legal substance, one that seems to have little to do with hitting a baseball. Experience shows that even testing for illegal drugs in sports has never been anything but a logistical minefield. Testing for legal substances would be worse.
—J.M.

1