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Ivan Maisel
November 30, 1998
Talented teams come and go, but there's one part of the collegiate sports landscape that remains constant: mascots, those sometimes lovable, larger-than-life creatures invented to stir school spirit. If you can't make it to campus, use the Web to revel in your mascot's bulbous-headed beauty—or to settle that my-furball-can-beat-up-your-furball argument with a conference rival.
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November 30, 1998

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Talented teams come and go, but there's one part of the collegiate sports landscape that remains constant: mascots, those sometimes lovable, larger-than-life creatures invented to stir school spirit. If you can't make it to campus, use the Web to revel in your mascot's bulbous-headed beauty—or to settle that my-furball-can-beat-up-your-furball argument with a conference rival.

?www.fansonly.com
The FANSonly college sports page has links to sites for nearly every Division I school. You can find bios of the individuals playing the mascot, as well as photos of the mascot in action.

?www.friendsoftraveler.com
The Friends of Traveler, USC's famous Trojan horse, post a newsletter and a schedule of the white horse's appearances. You will soon be able to buy Traveler T-shirts and other merchandise at this site. The money raised will go for Traveler's chow and transportation.

?www.slugs.com/slugweb
Who says college kids are apathetic? Learn the tumultuous history of the Banana Slug, which became UC-Santa Cruz's mascot in 1986 after student protests to replace its predecessor, the Sea Lion. While you're at the site, you can see what an actual banana slug looks like and find out about the animal. This is college, after all.

?http://cheeronline.com
Cheerleaders aren't mascots, but they do work closely with their fuzzy friends. The current issue of CHEERonline magazine includes a feature by Clay McGuyer, a Universal Cheerleaders Association mascot instructor.

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